Fresh or Frozen?


ImageBy: Nikki Nies

Making it a week before having to head to the grocery store can be a feat for some families.  How often do you run to the store to grab more fruit to pack in your kid’s lunch boxes or because you need some peas to put into the pot pie you’re making tonight?

Well, there’s often a debate on whether frozen or fresh are the better route to go. Like many things in life, with a balance of fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables it can be beneficial in the long run . Check out this table of the pros and cons of fresh and frozen veggies

Fresh foods Frozen Foods
Nutrients
  • Richer in vitamins and minerals than frozen
  • Best when used immediately cut or purchased
  • If eaten on a regular basis, may not provide enough of the required amount of vitamins and minerals
  • Not as nutritious as fresh foods
  • Less nutrient dense than fresh food
  • Does not have as “immediate” use as fresh foods
Preservatives
  • Those that are without preservatives are the best source of nutrients—easily absorbed by blood
  • If purchased locally, often can avoid the preservatives
  • Contain many preservatives to prevent from spoilage
  • Daily consumption isn’t good for the body
  • May be better than wilted fresh food
  • Contain many preservatives to prevent from spoilage
  • Daily consumption isn’t good for the body
  • May be better than wilted fresh food
Time to Prepare
  • Can be cooked quicker than frozen as they’re at a much lower temperature
  • Need to be thawed prior to use—need to plan ahead
  • Don’t require washing, peeling or chopping—prep free
  • Need to be thawed prior to use—need to plan ahead
  • Don’t require washing, peeling or chopping—prep free
Longevity
  • Spoil easily
  • Unless preserved, seasonal foods can not be consumed at all times of year
  • Quickly affected by bacteria and fungus
  • Minute produce is picked, it begins to lose its nutrienst
  • Freezing helps preserves foods for consumption later—can eat seasonally
  • Helps prevent waste
  • Prevents food decay, bacterial growth and/or chemical reactions
  • Doesn’t destroy nutrients
  • No unwanted additives are needed
  • Freezing helps preserves foods for consumption later—can eat seasonally
  • Helps prevent waste
  • Prevents food decay, bacterial growth and/or chemical reactions
  • Doesn’t destroy nutrients
  • No unwanted additives are needed
Our Market
  • Often times “fresh” has been kept fresh with preservatives
  • Never know how “fresh” produce is
  • Can’t tell what and if produce have been injected
  • Often takes at least 1000 miles from farm to table and can lose “freshness”
  • May be harvested before it reaches nutritional peak, then artificially ripened during transport
  • More than likely don’t have preservatives
  • Most produce that is freezed after fully ripened, which allows vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to be “locked in”
  • Easier to find “naked” produce—with single word ingredient lists—nothing added
 •    More than likely don’t have preservatives
•    Most produce that is freezed after fully ripened, which allows vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to be “locked in”

  • Easier to find “naked” produce—with single word ingredient lists—nothing added

As stated, purchasing both fresh and frozen will you a variety of tastes, nutrients and hopefully give you a chance to experiemnt next time in the kitchen.

Source: http://health.yahoo.net/articles/nutrition/photos/5-good-reasons-buy-frozen-fruits-veggies#0

 http://health.yahoo.net/articles/nutrition/photos/5-good-reasons-buy-frozen-fruits-veggies#

http://idiva.com/versus-health/fresh-foods-vs-frozen-foods/2260

One thought on “Fresh or Frozen?

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