DYK About DKA?


By: Nikki Nies

Sources: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetic-ketoacidosis/basics/definition/con-20026470

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/ketoacidosis-dka.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/118361-overview

https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000320.htm

How Oranges Trump OJ


Original Image by Rego Korosi via Flickr
Original Image by Rego Korosi via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

Growing up, I was lucky to have my mother make me breakfast every morning. Before I became accustomed to coffee, my mother would heavily encourage me to drink the orange juice she poured, as it would ‘wake me up’ and it’d be a way to get more fruit into my day. I can see why my mother pushed me to drink the orange juice instead of handing me an orange, as there may be misperceptions about ‘orange’ juice being just as healthy.  The USDA allows fruit juice companies to make statements such as ‘one serving is equal to one serving of fruit’, yet after further research, I can attest they’re not equal.  Now, the general advice is to opt for fruit, instead of the juice form, which is stripped of fiber, but added sugar has been included.

While fresh fruit and freshly squeezed orange juice contain approximately the same levels of carotenoids and vitamin C, the levels of flavonoids are lower and pasteurized orange juice contains more antioxidants.  In particular, the flavonoid, hesperidin, is concentrated in pulp and shows promise as an anti-inflammatory by lowering blood pressure and promoting healthy cholesterol.  In addition, studies have found  nutrients in some fruits and vegetables are more bioavailable when chopped, mashed, juiced or prepared with oils. However, I’m not promoting the switch to juices just yet.  Unless you’re making your own juice, the typical jug or bottle of juice purchased at the grocery store spikes blood sugar levels more and at a quicker rate than eating whole fruit.  A study from Harvard found a link between regular juice consumption and increased risk of type 2 diabetes, meaning the downsides of juice unfortunately far outweigh any potential boosts from carotenoids.

Furthermore, store bought fruit juice tends to have a bit less concentrated fructose than soda, with fructose surmised to be a riskier form of sugar than glucose due to the increased risk of chronic diseases (e.g. liver and cardiovascular disease). Deemed as ‘liquid sugar’, orange juice will leave the stomach much more quickly than whole oranges, due to the stripped fiber.

Nutrient Breakdown: An 8 oz glass of orange juice has approximately the same amount of energy as 2 oranges.

Amount per 100 g Orange Orange Juice
Calories 47 45
Total Fat  (g) 0.1 0.2
Saturated Fat (g) 0 0
Cholesterol (mg) 0 0
Sodium (mg) 0 1
Potassium (mg) 181 200
Carbohydrate (g) 12 10
Dietary Fiber (g) 2.4 0.2
Sugar (g) 9 8
Protein (g) 0.9 0.7
Vitamin A (IU) 225 220
Vitamin C (mg) 53.2 50
Calcium (mg) 40 11
Iron (mg) 0.1 0.2
Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.1 0
Vitamin B12 (µg) 0 0
Magnesium (mg) 10 11

As you can see, there’s more fiber and calcium in an orange fruit and the orange fruit contains natural sugar versus the added sugar that is put into orange juice.

I’m not sure why, but the calories one drinks doesn’t register as part of daily caloric intake. We have the tendency to gulp juice down in seconds, yet the healthier contrast of eating an orange requires more time, ‘feeding’ multiple senses while peeling.  Now that I’ve seen it for myself, next time I head to the grocery store, I’m stocking up on oranges!

Note: If you do opt for OJ, choose with pulp, then at least you’ll be getting some more fiber in!

Sources: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/01/22/378920980/for-more-nutrients-drink-oj-or-eat-an-orange-it-s-not-so-clear-cut

http://creationbasedhealth.com/whole-oranges-vs-orange-juice/

http://greatist.com/health/fruit-juice-increases-risk-diabetes-090313

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150121103301.htm

http://www.nutritionletter.tufts.edu/issues/11_5/current-articles/Oranges-vs-Orange-Juice-Which-Is-Better_1709-1.html

 

Chicken Medallions in Tarragon Sauce


Serves 8

IMG_9275Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. boneless chicken breasts
  • 1 egg plus 1 T water beaten well in bowl
  • Flavored breadcrumbs and flour for coating chicken
  • 1-14 oz. can artichoke hearts drained and quartered (reserve 3 t of liquid)
  • 1 stick sweet butter cup into eight pieces
  • 3 sprigs of fresh Italian parsley chopped-stems removed
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • 1 small jar pimentos
  • 1/3 oil for frying

Combine next three ingredients for Tarragon Sauce: IMG_9276

  • 2 T white vinegar
  • 2 T fresh tarragon (1 tsp dry) crushed between fingers
  • 3 t reserved liquid from artichoke hearts

Wash breasts and pat dry with paper towels. Cut into 1” cubes. Dredge in flour, dip into eggs and then breadcrumbs.

Heat oil in heavy skillet and fry chicken medallions on both sides until golden brown.

Drain on paper towel.

Remove any excess oil and wipe down skillet with paper towel.

At low heat, add butter and garlic, stir until garlic turns lightly golden.

Add tarragon mixture and simmer for one minute.

Add artichoke hearts and incorporate into mixture.

Remove pan from heat, stir in lemon juice, wine and chopped parsley.

Place chicken in oven proof serving dish. Lift artichokes from liquid and place around chicken*

Top with pimentos and cover with foil, slitting foil with knife to allow steam to escape.

Bake in preheated oven at 350F for 15-20 minutes.
Remove foil and bake for 10 minutes more.

*Stop at this point, cover and refridgerate when preparing ahead of time

IMG_9278

How to Travel with IBS


Original Image by fdecomite via Flickr
Original Image by fdecomite via Flickr

This article is based on an original post that first appeared on the Trim Traveler Blog entitled Have No Fear: Traveling Abroad with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 

By: Nikki Nies

While last minute trips can be fun, there always needs to be some type of planning involved. At minimum, this should include source of transportation. Bus? Driving? Catching the next flight out of the airport? Yes, this level of spontaneity may sound overwhelming for some that like to plan every detail. In reality, once kids are involved, there are other considerations that are factors in traveling, such as counting for a variety of entertainment and the number of diapers needed. In addition, for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), an intestinal disorder that can cause stomach pains, gas, diarrhea or constipation, it can make multi city traveling more nerve wrecking than appealing.

As a chronic condition, management of IBS is long term and can cause hurdles in traveling. I fondly remember I was in Thailand and one of people on the trip couldn’t leave the bathroom because of intestinal issues. When he wasn’t having diarrhea, he was too scared to leave the hotel in fear of a limited availability and quick access to bathrooms. It is a shame he traveled from the U.S. to Thailand to spend his time in a bathroom. For those of you that have been diagnosed with IBS, by implementing certain planning into your travel plans, you can enjoy your travels, pain free!

Some suggested travel inquiries:

  • Plan a trip that is calm or relaxing, as it may be less difficult to maneuver
  • Plan enough to know there are enough safe places to use the restroom
  • Pack and always keep own toilet paper with you. While most travelers should pack extra clothes in carry on, this can be particularly useful for those with IBS too.
  • Keep in reach fiber supplements, medications, bottled water and snacks (i.e. nuts or yogurt). Also, having doctor’s contact information and medical diagnosis listed can help with access to care.
  • Allow enough time to get places to avoid rushing and/or giving yourself enough time to assess a situation (i.e. limiting the amount of time between connecting flights can be stressful enough, give yourself at least 2 hours in between scheduled flights to get to your destination).
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions. You might want to ask, “Is there an early check in for hotel?” or “Does the hotel room come with a refrigerator?”
  • Investigate what measures you have to easily access bathrooms. Find out if you will need special coins and if you will have to buy toilet paper for access.
  • When booking flights, opt for the aisle seat for easier access to on flight bathroom.
  • If traveling in a foreign country learn phrases, such as “Where’s the bathroom”, “I can’t eat….” or “Can you make…[dish]…without?” A pocket dictionary or Google translate app can help with language translations too.
  • Be up front with traveling companions. Depending on your comfortability, let tour guides, friends and family know need for easy access to bathrooms. People are often more understanding than we give credit.
  • Traveling doesn’t always have the same schedule as one’s daily schedule, but try to consume the same serving and number of meals you’re used to.
  • If you’re up to trying new foods, experiment in small amounts.

A lot of these tips provide you asking lots of questions, but in the long run it will provide a more stress free trip. Having a few of the above-mentioned essentials can ease travel plans, but resist the temptation of overplanning! By leaving room for spontaneity, you can truly enjoy your travel! Happy travels!

Sources: http://www.everydayhealth.com/ibs/ibs-and-traveling.aspx

http://www.webmd.com/ibs/features/tips-traveling-with-ibs

http://www.aboutibs.org/site/living-with-ibs/travel

http://ibs.about.com/od/livingwithibs/tp/Travel-Tips-for-IBS.htm

http://mylifewithibs.com/travelling-with-ibs/