My Take on the Red/Processed Meat–>Cancer Debate


Original Image by Kim Ahlström via Flickr
Original Image by Kim Ahlström via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

Doesn’t every story always have two sides? The good news? The latest craze that bacon causes cancer is a bit of frenzy. The bad news for bacon lovers, this isn’t ‘new’ news, the American Institute for Cancer Research has declared the link between bacon and cancer for a while, yet the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s (IARC) report on the link between red meats, processed meats and colorectal cancer has brought the spotlight back on to this topic. Before vegetarians get on their soap box, bacon lovers declaring they can’t eat meat ever again or disregard this report by wanting to continue to eat how much whenever, what if I told you there is a middle ground?

Yes, you can have a few pieces of processed meats once in a while is not going to be a death sentence, but understanding what types of meats may contribute to cancer and why will help all wrap their heads around the concept.

“No one food causes cancer,” said Audrey Monroe a Dietitian and Director of Nutrition for the Kansas Beef Council.

Processed meats include those that have been cured, salted, smoked or a preservation method has been used (e.g. cold cuts, bacon, sausages, hot dogs, ham, pastrami, salami and pepperoni). To put the new classification in perspective, like outdoor pollution, UV radiation, alcohol, tobacco and cigarettes, the IARC ranked processed meats as a class 1 carcinogen. The physical method of grinding or mincing of meat does not automatically make it ‘processed.’  Red meats include beef, lamb and pork, with it being ranked as class 2A campaign. Yet, liver is clumped in the ‘red meat’ category, providing all necessary vitamins and minerals.

The mechanism of why and how these meats increase colorectal cancer is not definitive. There is speculation that increased risk is due to the addition of nitrates, nitrites, heme iron in red meat, smoking process and/or high temperatures.

Suggestions on how to lower consumption and cancer risk:

Original Image by Pawel Pacholec via Flickr
Original Image by Pawel Pacholec via Flickr
  • Replace processed and red meats with fresh chicken, fish and plant based proteins (e.g. eggs, cottage cheese, hummus, beans, tofu and legumes)
  • Swap out bacon, chorizo and salami with spicy vegetarian sausage
  • Opt for lean beef and loin cuts as quality protein helps one feel satiated and fuller longer to help maintain desired weight
  • Redirect focus on how meals can provide a balance of nutrients, including whole grains, fiber, lean meats and low fat dairy products
  • Vary the type of produce used as different vegetables provide anti cancer, antioxidant properties. The phytochemicals in vegetables work synergistically together to stave off cancer.

In addition to being mindful of the ranking, it’s important to note the amount of exposure to the carcinogen. Yes, cigarettes and processed meats have been both classified as class 1 carcinogens, but many smokers expose their bodies to tobacco multifold a day, while the same measurement can not be used when assessing processed meat’s impact on someone—instead we need to consider how big the portions and frequency of intake.

If you’re as legalistic as I am, what’s a ‘moderate’ amount of processed meats? 500,000 middle aged men and women were studied, finding that consumption of 50 g of processed meat increased risk of colon cancer up to 18%. In other words, the recommendation is to consume 70 g of less of red and processed meats. Limiting consumption of red meat to once a week/18 ounces (cooked) or less per week, one should not be concerned with an increased cancer risk. In other words, 18 ounces is ~4-quarter pounders hamburgers per week. If you’re eating hot dogs three to four times a week, perhaps, cutting back to once a week is a step you would be willing to take.

As you can see, nutrition is not black and white. While these IARC declarations has sparked debate, it doesn’t mean processed meats and red meat have to be cut out completely. With regular meal planning and mindfulness, all foods can fit.  The USDA and FDA are set to share new dietary guidelines by the end of this year, so it will be interesting how and if the WHO reports affect those guidelines.

Sources: http://blog.aicr.org/#sthash.OACxTxoR.dpuf

Do Bacon, Hot Dogs and Red Meat Cause Cancer? Facts and What You Need to Know!

http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/10/26/processed-meat-and-cancer-what-you-need-to-know/

http://lancasteronline.com/healthy-choices-what-you-eat-can-reduce-cancer-risk/article_86275722-78bf-11e5-b776-37879cab8ad7.html

http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/26/health/who-processed-meat-cancer-social-reaction/

Meat no more? Local health experts say not so fast

Cottage Cheese Filled Dates


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Image by David R. Blume goo.gl/vxxn1w

By: Nikki Nies

Whenever you’re pairing foods, you want to make sure they have the right balance of sweet and savory. The overpowering of one ingredient can lead to the

For as little in size that dates are, they’re nutrition powerhouses, containing fiber, the antioxidant tannins, beta carotene, vitamin A, potassium and iron. While the peanut butter stuffed dates trend has been going around, I’ve been trying to incorporate more cottage cheese into my meals as it is great to pair with savory or sweet foods. Pairing dates and cottage cheese is a great way to maintain protein content, but the added benefit of cottage cheese’s healthy fats. While low in calories, cottage cheese and dates are great spin on the traditional peanut butter stuffed dates.

IngredientsIMG_9084

  • ½ cup cottage cheese
  • 5 dates
  • Drizzle of honey
  • Sprinkle of  cinnamon

Instructions

Slice dates lengthwise, stuff with cottage             cheese. Drizzle honey and sprinkle cinnamon on top of each date. Eat up!

What additional toppings would you add to this easy, delectable snack?

Sources: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-dates.html

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/dates.html

Health Benefits of Dates – Promoting Heart, Brain, and Digestive Health

The Life of Ginger Hultin, MS, RD, LDN


gingerBy: Nikki Nies

Since moving to the Greater Chicago area, I can’t applaud the value of the Chicago Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (CAND) valiant efforts to provide resources, connections and some good ‘ol fun to its members!

Recently, We Dish Nutrition (WDH) had the pleasure to interview CAND’s President, Ginger Hultin, MS, RD, LDN, a Registered Dietitian at the Block Center for Integrative Cancer Treatment in Skokie, IL.  In addition, she’s been busy coordinating future CAND events, getting ready for the holidays and has even squeezed in a trip to Myanmar! apple

WDN: What is the most rewarding aspect of being a RD?

GH: I love being a dietitian so much. Working closely with clients over time, I get to see the amazing changes they can make. Gaining or losing weight, getting a clean cancer scan, improving labs or curing nutritional deficiencies…any of this is possible when I get to work with someone and see them often. It’s rewarding to see someone empowered that they can improve their health through nutrition!

WDN: What is some of the background work that goes into being a RD at the Block Center? [i.e. what are some responsibilities and/or duties one may not realize is part of your job?]

GH: The Block Center is a very unique place to be a dietitian, but one that allows me to use the skills I worked to develop at Bastyr University where I did my graduate work. For example, the dietitians cook four days per week for our patients and their families; we have a fantastic demo kitchen and I develop recipes and cook for 10-30 people when I’m there! I also specialize in supplementation, namely vitamins, minerals and other natural products that are research-based to help treat deficiencies, lower inflammation, stimulate the immune system or whatever else my patients might need (based on blood labs, of course!). Having a background in research is critical to working in oncology environment and this is another big part of my job. Cancer research changes constantly so combing articles daily is part of what I do to stay current.

WDN: For those interested in learning more about the oncology concentrated aspect of the nutrition field, how can they learn more? 

GH: I would start by joining the Oncology Dietetic Practice Group: http://www.oncologynutrition.org/. They are a fantastic resource for new research, webinars, an annual symposium and nutrition resources. Other than that, I love the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics book Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, published in 2013. It gives a broad approach to all aspects of nutrition oncology including medical nutrition therapy for different types of cancers. Finally, as we know that people with cancer are hugely interested, statistically, in complementary and alternative medicine, I use Natural Medicines Database almost daily in my practice:  http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/home.aspx?cs=&s=ND.

WDN: What exciting things are planned with CAND for 2015?

GH: The Chicago Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has been on fire this year!  We have National Nutrition Month events in March with a special meeting to celebrate “RD Day” mid-month. Policy leaders from our organization will be attending Illinois State Advocacy Day in Springfield and we have a fantastic line up for the State Spring Assembly in April where several of our members will be earning prestigious Academy awards at a special educational dinner. CAND has two more education dinners for our members and I’m hoping that we can participate in a spring run or walk to help raise money for a charitable organization – with all of our physically active members, I think it makes sense to set a positive example in the community, as we have been doing all year at nutrition events around the city. I’m also really excited about CAND’s social media – we have a strong presence on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Pinterest to help connect our members in so many ways.

CAND image 2 (1)WDN: What opportunities are available for CAND members that not as many people know about?

GH: Great question – there are many!  First off, aside from the educational meetings, all members are always invited to attend board meetings. It is more exciting than it seems to see how the organization is ran and also a great way to become more involved. Our website is really a wonderful resource that we’ve worked hard on; we have an active blog (which members can post to!), a speakers bureau, and job/volunteer postings which we update weekly both on the website and in e-blasts. Some of my members miss out on the e-blasts when they go to “Social” boxes in Gmail so be sure to pull over those important pieces of CAND communication. Joining a committee is easy; all you have to do is reach out to me and I can connect you with the next meeting of whichever group you are interested in becoming involved with. We have about 10 very active committees within the organization that are always looking for new talent

WDN: You recently spent three weeks in Myanmar, what made you choose to visit this country as your vacation? What was your impression of the culture, food and the people?

GH: Myanmar was an incredible experience. As the country very recently opened to tourism due to a change in government control a few years ago, we thought it would be an opportunity to experience a somewhat unchanged culture because of their limited access to outside influences. The culture is predominantly Buddhist and this is a very important aspect of daily life for Myanmar.  Myanmar is also one of the safest places I’ve ever traveled; we had so much fun taking pictures with curious local people and experiencing their daily lives. The food was absolutely delicious – noodle and rice based, they have an emphasis on vegetables including different greens, cabbage, broccoli and hot peppers and serve egg in almost every dish. They offer a lot of seafood dishes including fish-based soups and have the most delicious tofu which is made from chickpeas instead of soybeans.

WDN: What was your most memorable meal in Myanmar?

GH: There is a state in Myanmar called Shan State and the people there are Thai decedents. Shan noodles are a staple dish served with tomato sauce, crushed peanuts and lots of garlic. The noodles are spicy and served with broth on the side, and even though the daily temperatures reach into the 90’s and above, eating hot soup for lunch and dinner is strangely satisfying. I hope to learn how to make Shan noodles at home if I can.

WDN: What do your future travel plans entail?

GH: I have a lot of US travel planned this year; I try to go somewhere new every month if I can. Also, I cannot WAIT to go back to Southeast Asia. I would love to visit Myanmar again, maybe to stay and work in a school there for awhile. I am also fascinated by Vietnam and Cambodia.  I have a dream of visiting China as well, hopefully in the near future.

WDN: What’s a holiday tradition that your family continues today?

GH: We always play board games!  Now that we’re adults, this might also include drinking red wines from Washington State, where I’m from originally. It’s fun to try new games each year – the ones with a lot of interaction are best and I really enjoy spending this time with my parents, brothers, husband and close family friends.

tahiniWDN: What’s your favorite food? How do you take your coffee?

GH: Spicy food – Pho, enchiladas, tofu, pizza….I love it all!  I am a veggie so I’m always trying new vegetarian restaurants around Chicago. Being from Seattle, coffee is important to me. I have a cup or two a day and take just a splash of almond or soy milk on top.

Thanks Ginger for this enjoyable and informative interview! We sincerely appreciate your hard work and dedication to the dietetics profession!

Growing Ginger


Original Image by Andrés Monroy-Hernández via Flickr
Original Image by Andrés Monroy-Hernández via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

A few months ago, I was down south visiting my parents and mother made a point to head to the Asian market for some candied ginger.  If you’re familiar with my life mantra, of the less expensive, more fresh and homemade, the better, then you’re probably not surprised to hear that I approached the purchase of candied ginger as “how can we make this ourselves?”  Also, I love a challenge! While a few months have passed, mother’s liking of candied ginger hasn’t.  Therefore, this post is for my mother and all those adventurous souls willing to take a stab at making own ginger!

As part of the family of plants that create cardamom and turmeric, the part of ginger that is consumed is called the rhizome, the horizontal stem from which the roots grow.

There’s two major methods of growing ginger: 1) in the pot 2) in the ground!

1) In the pot: grab some ginger root from the grocery store and let it soak in water overnight.  Obtain a 14 inch x 12 inch deep pot and obtain potting soil and compost. Plant ginger root just below the surface of soil and place pot in an area of 75-85F.  Cooler temperatures may stunt growth! At the beginning, water lightly until shoots appear.

With patience and at least ten to twelve months, the plant will mature to two to feet high. With the new sprouts that appear, replant or use!

2)In the ground: grab some ginger root from the grocery store and let it soak in water overnight.  Plant ginger root in rich, moist soil with temperatures below 75F.  Keeping buds facing up, plant ginger in the ground. Cooler temperatures may stunt growth! At the beginning, water lightly until shoots appear.

With patience and at least ten to twelve months, the plant will mature to two to feet high. With the new sprouts that appear, replant or use!

After a year, I can’t wait to make candied ginger with my mother!

Candied Ginger: 

Original Image by TheDeliciousLife via Flickr
Original Image by TheDeliciousLife via Flickr

Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 1 hr Yield: 1 lb.

Ingredients:

  • Nonstick spray
  • 1 pound fresh ginger root
  • 5 cups water
  • Approximately 3/4 pound granulated sugar
  1. 1. Spray a cooling rack with nonstick spray and set it in a half sheet pan lined with parchment
  2. Peel ginger root and slice into 1/8-inch thick slices.
  3. Place into a 4-quart saucepan with the water and set over medium-high heat. Cover and cook for 35 minutes or until the ginger is tender.
  4. Transfer the ginger to a colander to drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the cooking liquid. Weigh the ginger and measure out an equal amount of sugar. Return the ginger and 1/4 cup water to the pan and add the sugar. Set over medium-high heat and bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until the sugar syrup looks dry, has almost evaporated and begins to recrystallize, approximately 20 minutes. Transfer the ginger immediately to the cooling rack and spread to separate the individual pieces.
  5. Once completely cool, store in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Adapted from Alton Brown via the Food Network

In my household, I know the ginger would be used for ginger cookies, ginger tea and most importantly to help treat treat nausea, inflammation, and certain cancer, breast cancer specifically! With its versatile use, ginger can be a great alternative to traditional “sweets.”  What’re your favorite uses of ginger? Have you had prior experience planting your own?

Sources: http://andiesway.blogspot.com/2014/10/growing-ginger-my-first-time.html

http://www.tropicalpermaculture.com/growing-ginger.html

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/candied-ginger-recipe.html

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/part-ginger-plant-eat-74002.html

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265990.php

Nitrates & Nitrites


By: Nikki Nies esphoto_cold_cuts_meat_nitrites-504x334

While nitrates are not harmful in normal amounts, when consumed in excess, like any other food or ingredient, it can have adverse effects.  excess nitrates can be especially harmful for children who tend to eat more nitrate rich foods, leading to a higher risk of leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and ovarian, colon, rectal, bladder, stomach, esophageal, pancreatic, and thyroid cancer.

Nitrates are naturally found in vegetables, such as spinach and celery and also synthetically added into foods.  For example, sodium and potassium nitrate are added to cured meats, added to fats to prevent rancidity and to bacteria to prevent further growth.  Also, found naturally in tap water due to nitrogen based fertilizers.  Yet, when nitrates are used as a food additive and/or consumed, the nitrates can quickly turn into nitrites, which when exposed to high heat during cooking can lead to the conversion to nitrosamines.  Bear with me!

Nitrosamines are chemical compounds that are carcinogenic properties.   However, this doesn’t mean you have to give up your leafy greens.  Not all nitrates are the same.  There’s a stark, but good difference between the nitrates from produce and the nitrates from preserved foods.  The nitrates in produce inhibit the conversion to nitrosamines, unlike the nitrates and nitrites in the artificially, synthetically made foods.

Suggested tips to nitrate success:

  • Limit intake of processed foods and cured meats (i.e. hot dogs, sausage and/or cold cuts).
  • Read nutrition fact label of prepackaged foods, watch out for ingredient lists that include nitrates, nitrites and/or nitrosamines compounds
  • Skip the “uncured” and “nitrate free” brands: these products usually contain a high content of nitrates from celery juice
  • When possible, opt for 100% organic products as they’re guaranteed to not have been exposed to nitrogen filled fertilizers
  • If you live in an agricultural region, may want to opt for a home water distiller, which will limit the amount of nitrates in your tap water
  • By eating well balanced meals, you’ll naturally include antioxidant rich foods, which combat the effects of nitrates!

This post is meant to help, not scare you.  Again, naturally grown produce may have nitrates, but do not have the same harmful effect as the nitrates that are synthetically added into prepackaged foods.  Make sure to give yourself plenty of time to read through the ingredient next time you’re grocery shopping! Happy shopping!

Photo Credit: Healthy Child

Sources:http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/seasoningflavoring/a/nitrates.htm

http://www.eatrightontario.ca/en/Articles/Food-technology/Biotechnology/Novel-foods/The-truth-about-nitrates.aspx#.VCCz5WTF_M0

http://www.epa.gov/teach/chem_summ/Nitrates_summary.pdf

http://www.medicinenet.com/nitrates-oral/article.htm

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w00/nitrosamine.html

http://healthychild.org/easy-steps/avoid-nitrates-and-nitrites-in-food/

Guide to Vitamins


vitamin-chart-final

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/14/vitamins-in-food-infographic_n_5678662.html?utm_hp_ref=food&ir=Food

High Fiber Musts


By: Nikki Nies

High fiber diets are always tooted as a lifestyle must! What does high fiber mean, you ask? It means consuming a diet of at least 21-25 g of fiber for women and 30-38 grams of fiber for men.  If meal planning isn’t part of your daily routine, it’s easy to let the days go by and not fulfill the daily fiber recommendations.  Gradually increase your fiber intake as a quick surge in fiber can lead to bloating and gas.

The best way to consume a high fiber diet is to eat more foods that have a higher fiber content! Can you guess what tops the list of the highest fibrous foods per serving?

————————————————————

  1. Corn bran, raw: 1 oz.=22 g of fiber
  2. Navy beans or white beans: 1 cup=19 g of fiber
  3. Yellow beans, cooked: 1 cup=18 g of fiber
  4. Adzuki, French, or black turtle soup beans: 1 cup=17 g of fiber
  5. Split peas, cooked: 1 cup=16.3 g of fiber
  6. Kidney or cranberry beans: 1 cup=16.0 g of fiber 
  7. Mung or pinto beans: 1 cup=15 g of fiber high-fiber-diet
  8. Lentils, cooked: 1 cup=15.6 g of fiber
  9. Black beans: 1 cup=15.0 g of fiber
  10. Oat or wheat bran, raw: 1 oz.=12.0 g of fiber
  11. Lima beans: 1 cup=13.2 g of fiber
  12. Baked beans, vegetarian, canned, cooked:1 cup=10.4 g of fiber
  13. Artichoke, cooked: medium=10.3 g of fiber
  14. Green peas, cooked: 1 cup=8.8 g of fiber
  15. Raspberries: 1 cup=8 g of fiber

A high fiber diet + adequate fluid intake is the right combination for smoother digestion, lower one’s risk of obesity, heart disease and/or cancer.  Furthermore, since fiber isn’t digested, it moves through the body quickly, helping to aid in constipation.

Have you added more fiber into your daily diet?  What changes have you seen accompany these fibrous additions?

Sources:http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/high-fiber-foods/art-20050948

http://thehealthyapron.com/2010/08/20/a-fiber-fortified-world/

http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/063008p28.shtml

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000193.htm

Undercover Nikki


By: Nikki NiesDIETITIAN vs NUTRITIONIST

Recently, I attended a smoothie night at my local library.  I was looking forward to possibly getting additional ideas of what to add to my smoothies.  I quickly realized that my role as a relaxed taste taker turned into an undercover nutrition student.   I want to explain that my intention in going to the event was to enjoy myself, but once a few inaccurate statements occurred, I couldn’t help, but put my detective cap on.

My intention isn’t to slam this “board certified health expert” as she called herself, but to bring attention to the inaccuracies she discussed and how you can tune into false health information.  For example, she stated

  •  The only type of “super food” one should add to smoothies are dulse seeds.  When in fact, superfoods are foods that have been found to stave off chronic diseases (i.e. heart disease, diabetes, cancer and/or cholesterol), provide more variety and color in one’s diet
  • Several times some one would ask a question and she would deflect by answering “that’s a whole other topic.”  For example, she had listed that smoothies are rich in magnesium, yet she couldn’t explain the “how.”
  • Referred to USDA’s dietary guidelines as represented in MyPyramid.  In actuality, as of 2010 MyPlate is used to represent dietary guidelines.
  • I personally asked her where she does her research and what kinds of websites she would direct us to if we wanted to do further reading on healthy eating.  She replied that she uses a list of websites, but she didn’t know any website names off the top of her head.
  • She would rather opt for cleanses than to take prescription.  To a certain point, I understand the desire to treat and/or prevent illness naturally, but she swears by natural remedies with no discussion of medications.

Yes, I’m biased that Registered Dietitians (RDs) are the premiere food and nutrition expert as that’s what my career and credentials will reflect soon.  However, until my exposure to a nutritionist’s way of thinking and explanation, I hadn’t seen first the extreme differences in a RD and a nutritionist.  While some may argue there isn’t much difference between RD vs. nutritionist, the skill set, expertise and knowledge base is miles different.

I hope the above examples I provided for you gives a clearer picture of skeptical information.  Additionally, I hope you don’t encounter such information in the future.  Yet, no matter where you are, having your “detective” glasses on, discerning the information provided, what’s the evidence behind certain statements and does the information sound logical can go a long way in regards to keeping one sane and healthy.

Sources: http://michelle-livedontdiet.com/blog/2014/3/15/dietitian-vs-nutritionist

Diarrhea 101


By: Nikki Nies

Diarrhea can be caused by a variety of instigators (i.e. parasites or poor water).  It can also be indicative of an underlying disease.  Either way you look at it, when diarrhea is present, it’s worth looking into.

The definition of diarrhea is relative and is individualized to situations.  Although, the determination of diarrhea often includes the talk of frequency and consistency of one’s stools.  Absolute diarrhea is defined as having more bowel movements than normal.  Among healthy individuals, the maximum number of bowel movements is three.

Why are you having more than 3 bowel movements you ask?

Potential Causes:diarrhea

  • Stomach Flu–viral gastroenteritis: will go away in a matter of days
  • eating or drinking products that have bacteria or parasites
  • Certain antibiotics
  • Chemotherapy for cancer
  • Laxatives containing magnesium
  • Celiac Disease
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn’s Disease
  • Lactose Intolerance
  • Malabsorption syndrome
  • Nerve Disorders that supply the intestines
  • Radiation
  • Gastrectomy

Without proper treatment of diarrhea, it can lead to dehydration, which can then lead to orthostatic hypotension. Electrolytes, such as potassium or sodium, may become lost with water, leading to electrolyte or mineral deficiencies.

Treatment: Oral Rehydration Solutions (ORS) are a mixture of carbohydrate (glucose) and electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, citrate or bicarbonate). The glucose forces the small intestine to quickly absorb the fluid and electrolytes.  Name brands of ORS includes Rehydralyte, Pedialyte or Resol.  Infants with diarrhea should not be given antibiotics, but be seen by their pediatrician to identify underlying cause.  For older children and adults, should drink diluted fruit juices, sports drinks (i.e. Gatorade) and water.

Caffeine and lactose containing products should be limited with diarrhea as it can exacerbate the situation.  If there is no nausea or vomiting, solid foods can be continued to consumed.  It’s suggested to consume rice, bananas, toast, tea, cereal and/or lactose free products to calm one’s stomach.

It’s important to gauge diarrhea’s appearance.  If you’re finding black, blood or pus in stool, stomach pain that isn’t relieved after a bowel movement, diarrhea worsens or does not get better after 2 days, moderate or severe dehydration, diarrhea with a fever greater than 101F and/or you’ve developed diarrhea after visiting a foreign country,  contact your primary care physician (PCP).

Prevention of bacteria can include the regular consumption of probiotic rich foods, such as yogurt.  Also, frequent hand washing and hand gels, before eating and after using the restrooms can be a great way to limit germs.  When traveling outside of the country, especially those underdeveloped, only drink bottled water, do NOT consume dairy products, raw shellfish or raw meat and/or fruits and vegetables without peels.

Diarrhea is inevitable at least in once in a lifetime, yet hopefully you’re confident in the passing of stool.  Pun intended.

Photo Credit: Gena Livings

Sources: http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/digestive-diseases-diarrhea

http://www.medicinenet.com/diarrhea/article.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diarrhea/basics/definition/con-20014025

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/understanding-diarrhea-basics

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/DDISEASES/pubs/diarrhea/index.aspx

http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/symptoms/diarrhea/overview.html

50 Reasons To Exercise


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