How Oranges Trump OJ


Original Image by Rego Korosi via Flickr
Original Image by Rego Korosi via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

Growing up, I was lucky to have my mother make me breakfast every morning. Before I became accustomed to coffee, my mother would heavily encourage me to drink the orange juice she poured, as it would ‘wake me up’ and it’d be a way to get more fruit into my day. I can see why my mother pushed me to drink the orange juice instead of handing me an orange, as there may be misperceptions about ‘orange’ juice being just as healthy.  The USDA allows fruit juice companies to make statements such as ‘one serving is equal to one serving of fruit’, yet after further research, I can attest they’re not equal.  Now, the general advice is to opt for fruit, instead of the juice form, which is stripped of fiber, but added sugar has been included.

While fresh fruit and freshly squeezed orange juice contain approximately the same levels of carotenoids and vitamin C, the levels of flavonoids are lower and pasteurized orange juice contains more antioxidants.  In particular, the flavonoid, hesperidin, is concentrated in pulp and shows promise as an anti-inflammatory by lowering blood pressure and promoting healthy cholesterol.  In addition, studies have found  nutrients in some fruits and vegetables are more bioavailable when chopped, mashed, juiced or prepared with oils. However, I’m not promoting the switch to juices just yet.  Unless you’re making your own juice, the typical jug or bottle of juice purchased at the grocery store spikes blood sugar levels more and at a quicker rate than eating whole fruit.  A study from Harvard found a link between regular juice consumption and increased risk of type 2 diabetes, meaning the downsides of juice unfortunately far outweigh any potential boosts from carotenoids.

Furthermore, store bought fruit juice tends to have a bit less concentrated fructose than soda, with fructose surmised to be a riskier form of sugar than glucose due to the increased risk of chronic diseases (e.g. liver and cardiovascular disease). Deemed as ‘liquid sugar’, orange juice will leave the stomach much more quickly than whole oranges, due to the stripped fiber.

Nutrient Breakdown: An 8 oz glass of orange juice has approximately the same amount of energy as 2 oranges.

Amount per 100 g Orange Orange Juice
Calories 47 45
Total Fat  (g) 0.1 0.2
Saturated Fat (g) 0 0
Cholesterol (mg) 0 0
Sodium (mg) 0 1
Potassium (mg) 181 200
Carbohydrate (g) 12 10
Dietary Fiber (g) 2.4 0.2
Sugar (g) 9 8
Protein (g) 0.9 0.7
Vitamin A (IU) 225 220
Vitamin C (mg) 53.2 50
Calcium (mg) 40 11
Iron (mg) 0.1 0.2
Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.1 0
Vitamin B12 (µg) 0 0
Magnesium (mg) 10 11

As you can see, there’s more fiber and calcium in an orange fruit and the orange fruit contains natural sugar versus the added sugar that is put into orange juice.

I’m not sure why, but the calories one drinks doesn’t register as part of daily caloric intake. We have the tendency to gulp juice down in seconds, yet the healthier contrast of eating an orange requires more time, ‘feeding’ multiple senses while peeling.  Now that I’ve seen it for myself, next time I head to the grocery store, I’m stocking up on oranges!

Note: If you do opt for OJ, choose with pulp, then at least you’ll be getting some more fiber in!

Sources: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/01/22/378920980/for-more-nutrients-drink-oj-or-eat-an-orange-it-s-not-so-clear-cut

http://creationbasedhealth.com/whole-oranges-vs-orange-juice/

http://greatist.com/health/fruit-juice-increases-risk-diabetes-090313

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150121103301.htm

http://www.nutritionletter.tufts.edu/issues/11_5/current-articles/Oranges-vs-Orange-Juice-Which-Is-Better_1709-1.html

 

Review: Justin’s


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Disclosure Agreement: Review of Justin’s was due to compensation from the company’s whose products were reviewed. We Dish Nutrition tested each product thoroughly and gives high marks to only the very best. Opinions expressed at We Dish Nutrition are own. 

By: Nikki Nies

Do you describe your taste preferences as more sweet or savory? While many are loyal followers of either end of the taste spectrum, if you’re a middle of the road kind of guy or gal, you reap the benefits and flavors of both sides. Scary thought though.  With double the flavors of savory and sweet, I’m sure it can be hard to comb through the products that call your name.

I’m here today to share the story of Justin’s, a line of nut butters that originated in Boulder farmer’s markets and now is sold nationwide, which easily meets the need of sweet and savory in the same bite. Since inception in 2004, the founder, Justin Gold, has overcome the hurdles that come with developing a business plan.

I’m grateful for Justin’s creativity and drive to produce quality products. I’m sure you’ve seen Justin’s product in Whole Foods, Target, Jewel-Osco, Publix, Safeway, Shop Rite, Stop & Shop, Wegmans, Kroger, Giant, Giant Eagle, Bashas’, Harris Teeter, HEB and/or the Fresh Market. If you haven’t, ask a sales associate next time you’re in the store and join a following that are thoroughly enjoying all-natural, high-quality ingredients.

His products include 16 ounce jars, 1.15 ounce squeeze packs that are great portable, portion controlled protein packed foods. Not only are the nut butters packed with vitamin E and fiber, but they are offered in Maple Almond Butter, Chocolate Hazelnut Butter, Classic Almond Butter, Classic Peanut Butter, Honey Peanut Butter, Vanilla Almond Butter, Honey Almond Butter and Chocolate Almond Butter.  In addition, for those that enjoy the sweeter side of life, Justin’s offers USDA certified organic all peanut butter cups made with Rainforest Alliance Certified cocoa.

IMG_8945I recently used Justin’s Classic Peanut Butter, which contains ONLY dry peanuts and oil as ingredients, to make his recipe of Peanut Butter Cookies.  This recipe is so simple and tasty! I couldn’t believe it took only three ingredients! Being an avid experimental baker, I couldn’t bring myself to use the entire full cup of brown sugar listed in the recipe. Instead, with a little over 1/2 cup of brown sugar, the cookies were as delicious as can be! Interested to learn other ways to use Justin’s products in your kitchen, check out his recipes and make yourself a grocery list!

The reason I love Justin’s peanut butter is because his products’ quality and nutrition content has not wavered.  At a serving size of 2 tablespoons, at 190 calories, 7 g of carbohydrates, 8 g of protein, o mg of cholesterol, 16 g of fat and 4 g of dietary fiber, I can’t complain!

Interested in created your own product? Justin’s two cents is

The most important thing is just to start. You will never end up anywhere if you don’t start somewhere. If I hadn’t started making jars, it wouldn’t have given me the opportunity to get to where I am today.

Justin’s has also involved themselves in sustainability efforts, sourcing the highest-quality, local ingredients, simplifying the supply chain, and initiating environmentally friendly office practices.  In collaboration with Conscious Alliance and Whole Planet Foundation, Justin’s does it part in hunger relief and global poverty relief efforts. With initiatives like these, how can you not support Justin’s?! I know I’m ready to try out his Maple Almond Butter and Banana Ice Cream next, are you?

Check out Justin’s Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | PinterestSite | Blog

Photo Credit: Justin’s 

Cottage Cheese Filled Dates


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Image by David R. Blume goo.gl/vxxn1w

By: Nikki Nies

Whenever you’re pairing foods, you want to make sure they have the right balance of sweet and savory. The overpowering of one ingredient can lead to the

For as little in size that dates are, they’re nutrition powerhouses, containing fiber, the antioxidant tannins, beta carotene, vitamin A, potassium and iron. While the peanut butter stuffed dates trend has been going around, I’ve been trying to incorporate more cottage cheese into my meals as it is great to pair with savory or sweet foods. Pairing dates and cottage cheese is a great way to maintain protein content, but the added benefit of cottage cheese’s healthy fats. While low in calories, cottage cheese and dates are great spin on the traditional peanut butter stuffed dates.

IngredientsIMG_9084

  • ½ cup cottage cheese
  • 5 dates
  • Drizzle of honey
  • Sprinkle of  cinnamon

Instructions

Slice dates lengthwise, stuff with cottage             cheese. Drizzle honey and sprinkle cinnamon on top of each date. Eat up!

What additional toppings would you add to this easy, delectable snack?

Sources: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-dates.html

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/dates.html

Health Benefits of Dates – Promoting Heart, Brain, and Digestive Health

Review: Larabar


Review of Larabar was due to compensation from the company’s whose products were reviewed. We Dish Nutrition tested each product thoroughly and gives high marks to only the very best. Opinions expressed at We Dish Nutrition are our own. 

By: Nikki Nies

I frequent my grocery store well enough if that if I were to be captured, blindfolded and told I had to go grocery shopping that way, I wouldn’t skip a beat. With that said, I’ve always passed aisle 13, where the energy bars are. Over the years, I’ve, unfortunately, never found energy bars that filled me. While many bars tout themselves as a great snack with loads of protein, it can be hard to decipher which brands are worth the calories and money when they all promote the same qualities and nutrients. We all know they can’t ALL be that good!

thumbYet, during FNCE 2014, I tried Larabar’s new line of uber products, which were more filling than I expected! I especially enjoyed the cherry cobbler, which is a great mixture of dried cherries, almonds, pecans, cashews, raisins, dates and sea salt.  Those are some of my favorite foods and to have them in one bar was like little bits of heaven!

Now that I am transitioning from college life to career, I know my routine will have to change as well.  For me, that means ensuring I will have portable, nutrient packed foods on hand! Thank goodness I experienced the wonders of Larabar when I did! Not only do the flavors hold up to their name, but nutrient wise, they do too! My rule of thumb when skimming through snacks, especially energy bars is that it should be at least 3 grams of protein and fiber, mostly heart healthy fats (omega 3s), mostly whole grains and no more than 15 grams of sugar. A tall order, yes, but feasible!

Let’s do a breakdown of nutrient content of some of Larabar’s popular bars: W

    Nutrient Parameter      
  Nutrition Parameter Cashew Cookie Peanut Butter Cookie Cappuccino Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough
Calories ≤ 200 calories 230 calories 220 calories 200 calories 210 calories
Carbohydrates ≤ 30 g 23 g 23 22 g 28 g
Fiber ≥3 g 3 g 4 g 4 g 3 g
Sugar* ≤15 g 18 g 18 g 16 g 16 g
Total Fat ≤10 g 13 g 12 g 10 g 11 g
Protein ≥3 g 6 g 7  g 5 g 4 g
Sodium ≤ 100 mg 5 mg 70 mg 0 mg 55 mg

*With six ingredients or less found each bar, the fruit in the bars contribute to the higher sugar and carbohydrate content. These bars are free of added sugars,sweeteners, preservatives, fillers, and artificial colorings.

What are your initial thoughts on the chart above? Be mindful that not all of Larabar’s products are the most sugar friendly.Yet, it’s not a coincidence that nutrient wise, the peanut butter cookie is the best and is considered a Larabar favorite! Make sure to read nutrition fact labels, compare flavors and remember that moderation is key. Make sure you’re stocked with other fresh snacks to maintain balanced intake.

Another note, I am not training for an Iron Man or marathon, so I won’t emphatically look for bars that contain ≥40 g of protein. Yes, there are products out there! As a gal that’s on the go, Larabar’s work for me!

Furthermore, Larabar is a great value-nutrient and price wise and have made efforts to provide quality in all they do.  Everything from production to recycling. Like FSTG, Larabar is committed to the non-GMO project, ensuring its consumers that fifteen of its products are certified non-GMO! Since their partnership with TerraCycle, Larabar wrappers are part of the Energy Bar Wrapper Brigade, a free recycling program and fundraiser opportunity for participants.  LARABAR_Energy_Bar_Wrapper_Brigade_Arrow

Grab your wrappers out of the garbage and sign up to be part of the Brigade, one wrapper at a time! Unfortunately, not all products are available in Canada, so Canadians, don’t get your hopes up when browsing through Larabar’s products!

Check out Larabar’s Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Pinterest | eNewsletter | Blog | Site 

Disclosure Agreement: Review of Larabar was due to compensation from the company’s whose products were reviewed. We Dish Nutrition tested each product thoroughly and gives high marks to only the very best. Opinions expressed at We Dish Nutrition are our own. 

Photo Credit: Larabar

Source: http://www.cookinglight.com/eating-smart/smart-choices/best-energy-bars

http://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-runners/how-choose-best-energy-bars

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=802

Review: Mina Harissa


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Disclosure Agreement: Review of Mina Harissa was due to compensation from the company’s whose products were reviewed. We Dish Nutrition tested each product thoroughly and gives high marks to only the very best. Opinions expressed at We Dish Nutrition are our own. 

By: Nikki Nies

Expanding your palate can be done in many ways, whether that’s aimlessly grabbing new ingredients in the supermarket, hoping to find a hidden find of foods or meticulously assessing what flavors are already incorporated into your daily meals and where expansion would be most appropriate.

Why all this talk about expansion? As someone who always reached for the Tostitos’ mild salsa, I can’t help, but regret what other flavors over the years I’ve passed up because I deemed them as too spicy. However, a couple of years ago, I finally came to my senses, being introduced to the new world of flavors, textures and pizzaz that peppers can do to elevate any dish.

Harissa is a mostly commonly associated with Tunisia, Libya and Algeria, but has recently made a scene in Morocco via the Columbia Exchange.  The versatility of harissa, a Maghrebian hot chili pepper paste makes it a viable candidate to join your regular meals.  Variations of harissa include cumin, red peppers, garlic, coriander, lemon juice, roasted red peppers, serrano peppers, vegetable oil, olive oil, garlic paste, caraway and/or garlic paste. See how the options are endless?

I recently tried the brand Mina Harissa, a red pepper sauce created by Mina herself. Since the age of sixteen when Mina was first introduced to harissa, she has been in love with the fiery red sauce’s endless possibilities.  Mina worked tirelessly to add her own twist and personality to the sauce, finalizing it the recipe with red chili pepper, red bell pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, vinegar and salt.  While the proportions of the ingredients are not known, use of Mina Harissa’s sauces leave you grabbing the jar for seconds.

IMG_8925However, for today, we used the harissa recipe in Bon Appetit’s Pan-Roasted Chicken Harissa with Chickpeas’ recipe.  The harissa was used inside the chicken thighs to provide flavor. The chickpeas absorbed the spiciness of the harissa, that permeated the entire chicken. This recipe was a great initial use of the harissa as it provided a well balanced meal of protein, fiber and was low in fat.

The presentation of the meal highlights the different elements of flavor in the meal. I have to note that the lemon and parsley come directly from my parent’s house-yes, my parents have a few lemon trees!

Mina Harissa has cleverly come up with three kinds of sauces, mild, spicy and spicy green pepper sauce. Blended with green chili pepper, green bell pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, vinegar, cumin and salt, the green harissa adds an additional element of spice to any dish. These 10 ounce jars can be interchangeably used in the same dishes depending on the spice level wished. Keeping on hand in the kitchen, Mina Harrisa’s sauce can be used to create spreads, dips,drizzled on top of nearly any dish, or in this case, encassed in chicken with chickpeas.

If I had to quantify the level of spiciness on a ten point scale, the mild would be a two or three, reflecting the softer palates  The spicy Mina Harrisa is would be an eight. Use of Mina Harrisa’s products, particularly the spicy harissa is not suggested for those with gastrointestinal issues, sensitivities to chilis or peppers and/or the light hearted.

Many foodies have joined the harissa bandwagon, with tons of recipes catering to these unique flavors. I can wait to finish my jars of Mina Harrisa with the recipes I’ve already gathered to try, including Harissa Spiced Sweet Potatoes, Jalepeno Boats and Spicy Green Haddock. How do you plan to add Mina Harrisa’s products to your daily menu? I know you won’t regret adding this extra punch of flavor to your dishes.

Check out Mina Harissa’s Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Contact | Site 

Photo Credit: Mina Harissa 

Source: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pan-roasted-chicken-with-harissa-chickpeas#.UrMe9WXwges.facebook

Making Matcha Tea


By: Nikki Nies

Original Image by Jigme Datse Rasku via Flickr
Original Image by Jigme Datse Rasku via Flickr

In an article written by Kristen Kirkpatrick, MS, RD, LD, she discusses the 15 Foods to Add to Your Diet in 2015. Since I’m always interested in learning about the latest food trends and current recommendations, I had to learn more! The first food listed was matcha tea. While, I’m a fan of green tea ice cream, which contains matcha powder, the health benefits of matcha tea has eluded me. Therefore, today we’ll be discussing matcha!

Matcha tea, also spelled as maccha, is finely milled or fine powder green tea. This type of tea derives from Japan, ubiquitously present in tea ceremonies. Prior to the milling of matcha tea, it’s shaded for at least a month to increase chlorophyll production. The entire tea leaf is used, with increased chlorophyll content found in matcha tea is exorbitantly healthier than water that is brewed and diluted from a tea bag or strainer.

Original Image by Rowan Robinson via Flickr
Original Image by Rowan Robinson via Flickr

To obtain all the benefits of matcha tea, opt to keep it plain. It naturally contains vitamin C, potassium, iron and fiber. Additionally, it can boost one’s metabolism, fights against bacteria and virus, does not raise insulin levels and does not raise one’s heart rate or blood pressure. 10 glasses of green tea is equivalent to 1 glass of matcha tea. When one adds milk to matcha tea, it slightly decreases catechin, which is an antioxidant rich component of cancer fighting properties.

Presently, matcha is commonly used to add flavor and dye to foods–mochi, soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of wagashi, a confectionary sugar, yet in its purest form, as tea, one can obtain optimal benefits!  The flavor of matcha tea can vary, depending on the strength of the amino acids used.

What’re you waiting for? Put down the black, jasmine and oolong tea and get yourself some matcha!

Sources: https://www.yahoo.com/health/15-foods-to-add-to-c1418437164158/photo-1-matcha-tea-photo-1418436495156.html

http://www.matchasource.com/matcha-tea-health-benefits-s/14.htm

http://www.teavana.com/the-teas/green-teas/p/matcha-japanese-green-tea

Pseudograins


246353b24d55bd9ee4a810a9c74cBy: Nikki Nies

False grains, also known as pseudograins, are often associated with their whole grains counterparts, such as wheat, corn, barley, rice, millet and sorghum.While buckwheat has the word wheat in it, it is not composed of wheat! Confusing right?! Yet, pseudograins–amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa and wild rice are becoming more popular with the more shelf space allotted Although pseudograins have different botanical origins, pseudograins are similar in composition to grains, but often superior in nutrient content–high in protein, fiber, magnesium, potassium and more! Pseudograins are seeds and grasses that are often mistaken for grains.

Quinoa has received a lot of attention, rightfully so, but how much experience do you have with buckwheat or amaranth? Did you know you can make your own soba noodles with buckwheat? Who’s up for that challenge?

Pseudograin Description Nutrition Content Use
Amaranth
  • staple of Mayan and Aztec cuisine
  • pleasant, nut like flavor
  • tiny kernels–4000/teaspoon
  • Gluten free
  • Can toast the seeds prior to use to additional flavor and crunch to any dish
  • Protein
  • Iron
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphorus
  • vitamin A
  • vitamin e
  • vitamin C
  • Lysine–an essential protein
  • Breads
  • Can be popped like corn
  • Veggie Patty
  • Add to soups or chilis
  • Pudding
  • Cookies
  • Biscotti
  • Smoothies
  • Porridge or oatmeal
  • Substitute for rice, couscous, orzo or risotto
  • Without gluten, will have to mix with other flours for baking, with ratio 1:3; ¼ cup amaranth, ¾ cup additional flour=1 cup
Buckwheat
  • Is a broadleaf crop–in the same family as sorrel and rhubarb
  • seed is triangular shape
  • Dark hull is usually removed before milling–called groats
  • Kasha: toasted buckwheat groats
  • Dark buckwheat flour includes hulls
  • Protein
  • Potassium
  • Magnesium
  • vitamin e
  • Manganese
  • Iron
  • Calcium
  • Manganese
  • Breads
  • Pancakes
  • Granola
  • Blinis
  • Crepes
  • Muffins/rolls
  • Soba noodles
Quinoa (keen-wa)
  • sacred staple of Incan empire
  • mild corn and bean flavor
  • fruit of the herb–does not contain gluten
  • most of quinoa consumed in U.S. is imported from South America–when grown above 12,000 feet, it has the whitest color and sweetest taste
  • Protein
  • Potassium
  • vitamin e
  • Folic Acid
  • Iron
  • Calcium
  • As a complete protein, quinoa contains all essential amino acids
  • Stews, pilafs, salads or bread
  • Tabbouleh
  • Chili
  • As a side: i.e. to salmon
  • Quinoa crab cakes
  • Baked tomatoes with quinoa, corn and grilled chiles
  • Meatballs
Wild Rice
  • An aquatic seed found in freshwater lakes in Canada, Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota
  • Has a rich, nutty flavor
  • Color can vary from medium brown to almost pure black
  • Protein
  • B vitamins
  • Folic Acid
  • Lysine–an essential protein
  • Stir fry
  • Rolls
  • Dressing/Stuffings
  • Soups
  • Casseroles/pilafs
  • Quiche
  • Salads
  • Risotto

Now that you have a better understanding of the versatility of pseudograins, make sure to add these foods to your grocery shopping list if you don’t have on hand already! I’m going to try my hand at making buckwheat soba noodles using the following recipe:

Homemade Buckwheat Soba Noodles:

Homemade Soba NoodlesServings:

Ingredients

  • 2 generous cups stone-milled buckwheat flour 
  • 1/2 generous cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup  filtered or mineral water
  • Buckwheat starch or tapioca starch, for rolling the soba

Directions:

  1. Combine flours:  Sift through strainer into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Add water to the flour: Measure water and pour over the flours.
  3. Knead until a crumbly dough is formed: Work flours and water together with hands and knead n the bowl until it is a rough and slightly crumbly dough.
  4. Knead dough on the counter until smooth: Turn dough out onto the counter. Continue kneading until it holds together easily, does not crack while kneading, and becomes smooth.
  5. Shape the dough into a disk: Shape dough into a pointed cone, like a mountain peak. Press straight down on the peak with the palm of your hand, squishing it into a disk about 1/2-inch thick. The bottom should be very smooth. This step helps ensure that the dough is even and in a uniform shape before rolling.
  6. Roll out the dough: Sprinkle counter with a little starch and place dough on top. Sprinkle the top of the dough and the rolling pin with starch. Begin rolling out the dough, working from the center of the dough outward in long, even strokes. Gently tap the edges of the dough with your rolling pin to shape them into straight lines as you roll, gradually shaping the dough into as close a rectangular shape as you can make it. Use more starch as needed to prevent sticking. Continue rolling the dough into a rectangle longer than it is wide and 1/16-inch to 1/8-inch thick (as thin as possible!).
  7. Fold the dough: The next step is folding the dough to make it easier to cut straight, thin noodles. Spread a generous handful of starch over half of the dough. Fold the dough in half, like closing a book. Spread the bottom of the dough with more starch and fold the top down. Spread starch over the entire surface of the dough and fold the top down again.
  8. Slice the soba: Place a pastry scraper, ruler, or other thin, flat utensil over the top of the folded dough. Use this as a guide when cutting the noodles. Using chefs knife, begin cutting noodles 1/16-inch to 1/8-inch thick — the same thickness as your dough. Move the pastry scraper back with every cut to help you cut noodles with an even thickness. Toss the cut noodles with a little more starch to prevent sticking. Cook or freeze the soba within a few hours.→ Make-Ahead Moment: At this point, the soba can be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw in the fridge before cooking.
  9. Cook the soba: Set strainer in your sink. Fill a large bowl with cold water and ice cubes, and set this near the sink. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Salt the water generously and drop in the soba. Cook for 60 seconds, then drain through the strainer in the sink. Rinse thoroughly under cool water, lifting and gently shaking the soba until the cooking film is rinsed away. Immediately dunk the soba in the bowl of ice water. Drain and serve with dashi, soy sauce, and sesame oil, or use the soba in any recipe.

Recipe adapted from Kitchn

What’re your thoughts on the soba noodle recipe? Willing to join me in the fun?

Photo Credit:Chatelaine, New Fin My Soup

Sources: https://www.yahoo.com/beauty/meet-the-better-for-you-pseudograins-101346565775.html

http://sproutpeople.org/seeds/nuts/

http://www.wheatfoods.org/sites/default/files/atachments/grains-truth-ancient-and-pseudo-grains-513.pdf