Lacto Ovo vegeterians


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Original Image by Meal Makeover Moms via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

 

Lacto vegetarian (sometimes referred to as a lactarian; from the Latin root lact-, milk) diet is a vegetarian diet that includes dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, and kefir, but excludes eggs. Furthermore, this term is used to describe a vegetarian who does not eat eggs, but does eat dairy products. Many Hindu vegetarians are lacto-vegetarians who avoid eggs for religious reasons while continuing to eat dairy. The prefix “lacto” comes from the Latin word for milk

Some vegetarians eat a wide variety of foods that may include fish, eggs and even meat-based broths. Others are stricter and eat no animal products whatsoever, including honey and gelatin. Lacto vegetarians fall in the middle of the spectrum. They eat milk, yogurt, cheese and other dairy products, but they do not eat eggs or fish

The term “lacto vegetarian” comes from the Latin word lactis, meaning milk. Historically, many lacto vegetarians have followed religions that are widespread in the Far East, such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism, which incorporate nonviolence and respect for animals into their belief systems. In addition to avoiding meat, most lacto vegetarians avoid eggs because they are undeveloped embryos. A lacto-ovo vegetarian eats both eggs and dairy products.

Eating dairy products is the main factor that distinguishes lacto vegetarians from vegans. Lacto vegetarians eat milk and milk products, yogurt, cheese, butter and cream. However, they do not eat dairy products made with gelatin, such as some puddings and custards, because most gelatin contains pulverized animal hooves, bones or marrow. Lacto vegetarians also avoid dairy products containing animal-based rennet, a collection of enzymes that cheese-makers normally get from calves.

Additional foods that do not contain animal products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains and plant-based proteins, make up the rest of a lacto vegetarian diet. Examples include citrus fruits, berries, root vegetables, leafy greens, nuts, seeds, wheat products, oats, corn, beans, legumes and soy products. According to the USDA, a lacto vegetarian diet that is balanced among all of those foods plus dairy items can help reduce risks of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other health problems.

Menu Plan

A lacto vegetarian menu plan can look a lot like a plan for a traditional vegetarian, but without the eggs. A sample breakfast might be oatmeal with milk and berries, a yogurt and granola parfait or a tofu vegetable scramble. Lacto vegetarian lunch options include a green salad with a side of tofu and fruit, meat-free chili or pasta with vegetables and olive oil. For dinner, lacto vegetarians might have a bean burrito, lentil soup with bread and salad or a vegetable curry with rice.

Lacto-ovo vegetarians may have higher blood cholesterol levels because of the eggs they eat, so choosing to follow a lacto vegetarian diet may improve heart health and encourage weight loss or healthy weight maintenance. According to a 2004 study published in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,” self-identified lacto vegetarian women have a lower risk of overweight and obesity than women who eat meat. Additionally, the Mayo Clinic reports that all vegetarians tend to weigh less and consume fewer calories and fat grams than meat eaters.

Sources:http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/lacto-vegetarian-foods-5885.html

http://vegetarian.about.com/od/glossary/g/lactovegetarian.htm

Review: Food Should Taste Good


logoBy: Nikki Nies

I was first introduced to Food Should Taste Good (FTSG) product last fall.  Anyone who know me well, knows that chips are not a temptation food for me.  Offer me chips and I have no problem saying no, however, I am always willing to try new foods and I’m glad I was introduced to FSTG products.

The founder, Pete Lescoe’s career in restaurants and grocery stores confirmed that when real ingredients are good, the food and quality of the product will reflect it. The first flavors of chips created were multigrain and jalepeno, polar opposites in flavor, but part of the foundation of FSTG’s success. Since 2006, all FSTG products have been gluten free, cholesterol free, with no preservatives or additives, zero grams trans fats or MSG, certified Kosher and many are certified vegan.

FSTG story hasn’t been without its bumps, but I’m happy to hear how the company has responded to less than stellar responses to their line of Buffalo and Potato & Chive chips. The line of Buffalo chips were discontinued when it was clear its cousin, Jalepeno was holding down the spicy needs of consumers just fine!  Additionally, using the mulitgrain recipe as a starter for other creations, the recipe was adapted to form the popular Blue Corn chip.

In less than a decade, FSTG has expanded its line of chips, including kettle cooked chips, brown rice crackers and pita puffs.

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I recently tried the kimchi and blue corn chips for the first time. If you can get past the blue hue in the chip, which I love, the blue corn chips have the right balance of nutty flaxseed and corn.  I’m grateful FSTG assists its consumers on what to pair the chips with because I would be lost without that assistance! I wouldn’t know that blue corn chips would be great with roasted sweet potato hummus or baked cauliflower and white cheddar dip. So thank you FSTG!

While I love the pack of flavors in each chip, I would love the chips even more if they were made from 100% whole grains. I know FSTG has come a long way since 2006 and I’m sure there’s talk in the works to incorporate more whole grains, if not, 100% whole grains in FSTG products.  I understand that FSTG’s multigrain was part of the initial groundwork of FSTG, but revamping the line of products without multigrain could be beneficial.

Next time you’re in the store, check out the nutrition fact label of FSTG! Their line of products remind us that food that tastes good doesn’t necessarily have to be bad for you. For example,

Nutrient profile for Kimchi tortilla chips: Serving size: 12 chips; 140 calories; 7 g total fat; 17 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber and 2 g protein.

I was impressed to see that the serving sizes are reasonable and one can walk away content with one [maybe two] servings of FSTG chips.

nongmo-samplefbpostFSTG has made a lot of initiatives to provide only the best quality of products, we can all go to bed happy to know FSTG products have been verified by the non-GMO project.  In the spirit of transparency, the third party certification provides consumers more confidence in the quality of ingredients in FTSG.  With verification process underway, new product labeling is in the works. Check out the upcoming changes coming to your FTSG products!

What FSTG flavors are your favorite? What flavors do you wish FSTG would add to their line?

Check out FSTG’s Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | eNewsletter | Contact | Site 

Disclosure Agreement: Review of FSTG was due to compensation from the company’s whose products were reviewed. We Dish Nutrition tested each product thoroughly and gives high marks to only the very best. Opinions expressed at We Dish Nutrition are own. 

Photo Credit: FSTG

Seventh Day Adventist’s Mindful Practices


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Original Image by Bobbi Bowers via Flickr

 

By: Nikki Nies

While studying for my RD exam, I’ve come across and have been quizzed on various ethnic cultures and dietary restrictions. As you have seen, I’ve read more about dietary practices during the Lenten season and have delved further into what Kosher really means. Up until now, I’ve had a pretty good idea about what those dietary practices entailed, but the diet of Seventh Day Adventist is foreign to me. Do you feel the same way? Not quite sure what Seventh Day Adventist means?

Join me in the fun of learning all the details now! While the Seventh Day Adventist church promotes autonomy, the relationships in the church are meant to call one another higher, to live as positive examples of God’s love and devotion. In regards to diet and health, this means:

  • Gluttony and excess are to limited
  • The key to wellness is balance and temperance
  • Limit alcohol, tobacco and mind altering drugs, which can affect clear minds and wise choices
  • It’s believed a well balanced vegetarian diet that emphasizes legumes, whole grains, fruits, nuts, vegetables and sources of vitamin B12 will promote optimal health
  • Like the MyPlate guidelines, Adventists are advised to limit processed foods, sugar, sugar substitutes and food additives.

To remind you, a vegetarian diet has more benefits than the costs of the abstinence of meat. A vegetarian diet continues to provide evidence of lower risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes,obesity and/or high blood pressure.

Being vegetarian isn’t a requirement to be part of the Seventh Day Adventist church, yet many of the church go beyond the vegetarian diet,either eating raw foods or vegan. One of its founders, ellen White’s vision for the Seventh Day Adventist included eight principles for a healthy lifestyle: fresh air, sunshine, abstemiousness, rest, exercise, nutrition, water and trust in a divine power. The second part of the White’s vision included the establishment and devotion of health reform, health education and treating the ill in a new way.

As you can see, Seventh Day Adventist’s dietary practices are very similar to those of vegetarians, if not more strict. I’m proud to see the founder, White’s vision and principles for the church have been upheld since inception in the 1860s. For any of you that are practicing Seventh Day Adventist’s are there any key practices that I’ve missed? What personal practices do you follow in your daily life?

Sources: http://www.adventist.org/vitality/health/

http://www.adventist.org/beliefs/ http://www.seventhdayadventistdiet.com/

https://www.adventistarchives.org/fundamental-beliefs-of-seventh-day-adventists.pdf

Treat Yourself to Tempeh


Original Image by Gloria Cabada-Leman via Flickr
Original Image by Gloria Cabada-Leman via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

Looking to expand your food palate? Have you tried tempeh (tehm-pay)? While tempehhas been used as a source of protein in Indonesia for hundreds of years, it is now reaching buzz in other parts of the world. Similar to its cousin, tofu, tempeh is a meat alternative that is commonly consumed by vegetarians.  Like tofu, tempehis made from soybean through natural culturing and fermentation process that binds soybeans into a cake form.  With retention of the whole bean, tempeh has a higher fiber, protein and vitamin content than tofu.  Fermented cooked soy product that is made by a natural culturing and controlled fermentation process that binds soybeans into a cake form.

Original Image by Alpha via Flickr
Original Image by Alpha via Flickr

With it’s soy derivates, tempeh has a surprisingly versatile, delicious taste, providing vegans and vegetarians who are looking for additional protein sources means for new  experiments in the kitchen.  Specifically, with its firm texture and nutty mushroom flavor, it is traditionally sliced or cubed to be fried until surface is crisp or golden brown.  For a different take, tempeh can be grated like cheese or in soups, spreads, salads and/or sandwiches.

Due to its popularization, many local grocery stores carry tempeh and/or can be found in Asian supermarkets.  If you’re up to the challenge:

  1. Dehull soybeans and soak overnight, you can make your own tempeh!
  2. Once soaked, cook for approximately 30 minutes and mix with tempeh starter, which has spores or Rhizopus oryzae.
  3. It will be good to be used for eating and cooking after 36-48 hours of incubation.

You don’t have to be a vegetarian or vegan to enjoy tempeh.  With its phytochemicals,isoflavones andsaponins, it is becoming a more popular ingredient for all foodies.Isoflavones alleviate menopausal symptoms, strengthen bones and help reduce risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers.  Saponins are glycosides with foaming properties and can also be found in peas and herbs. During the fermentation process, tempeh obtains some digestive enzymes and reduces the phytic acid in soy, allowing the body to best absorb the soy’s minerals. Furthermore, as a complete protein, containing all nine amino acids.

I’m definitely adding tempeh to my grocery list! Looking forward to trying Tempeh Coconut Curry and Ginger Cilantro Honey Tempeh Salad! Why don’t you try with me?

Photo Credit:Wikipedia and Flickr

Sources:http://www.tempeh.info/

http://www.lightlife.com/Vegan-Food-Vegetarian-Diet/Organic-Tempeh.html

http://www.tofurky.com/tempehproducts/traditional_tempeh.html

http://vegetarian.about.com/od/glossary/g/Tempeh.htm

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=126

http://www.food.com/recipes/tempeh

Milk Substitutes


By: Nikki Nies

For hundreds of years, milk derived from animals only, such as cow’s, sheep and goat. Yet, with lactose intolerance, maldigestion and the preference for non-dairy sources of milk emerging in recent years, the market and need for milk substitutes as increased multifold. Like there are differences in whole milk, 2% and skim milk, the nutrition content, flavor, color and texture of non-dairy milks–soy, rice, oat, 7 grain, hazelnut, hemp, almond and coconut vary.

 

Milk Type Description Texture/consistency Nutrients–1 cup Use
Whole great source of vitamin D, B12 and calcium 147 calories; 8.1 g fat; 98 mg sodium; 12.9 g carbs; 12.9 g sugar; 7.9 g protein; 276 mg calcium; 349.4 mg potassium; 98 IU vitamin D
1% great source of vitamin D, B12 and calcium 91 calories; 0.7 g fat; 130 mg sodium; 12.3 g carbs; 12.3 g sugar; 8.7 g protein; 316.2 mg calcium; 419.1 mg potassium; 98 IU vitamin D
Soy–plain obtained from soy bean; closest option to cow’s milk; contains vitamin B12 and D; processed; can be high in sugar; comes in sweetened, unsweetened and flavored varieties such as chocolate and vanilla creamy 100 calories; 4 g fat; 120 mg sodium; 8 g carbs; 6 g sugar; 7 g protein; 300 mg calcium; 300 mg potassium; 119 IU vitamin D vegan–baking, coffee, as is, cereal
Almond made from ground almonds, water and sweetener; has ⅓ of calories as 2% milk; magnesium and protein content is good for bone strength; contains less sugar than soy or rice milk; tends to be high in sodium; contains vitamins A, D & E; low in protein; higher in fat than skim milk thick 60 calories; 2.5 g fat; 150 mg sodium; 8 g cars; 7 g sugar; 1 g protein; 200 mg calcium; 180 mg potassium; 100 IU vitamin D cereal, coffee, sipping, baking
Coconut richest, creamiest of all milk alternatives; when purchased in a carton, tends to have a lower fat content and is not as creamy as in can form; high in saturated fat and calories thick, creamy 80 calories; 5 g fat; 30 mg sodium; 7 g carbs; 6 g sugar; 1 g protein; 450 g calcium; 40 g potassium; 100 IU vitamin D ice cream, Thai curry, moistens cakes; coffee; tea
Hemp best for those with nut or soy allergies; rich in omega 3 fatty acids; low in saturated fat; mixture of hemp seeds  and water; contains essential amino acids; fortified with vitamin D and A; low in protein thick, creamy; “earthy” 100 g calories; 6 g fat; 110 mg sodium; 9 g carbs; 6 g sugar; 2 g protein; 300 mg calcium; N/A potassium; 100 IU vitamin D smoothies; porridge; baking; cereals
7 Grain–original Oats, Brown Rice, Wheat,  Barley, Triticale, Spelt and Millet thin 140 calories; 2 g fat; 27 g carbs; 3 g protein; 115 mg sodium; 125 mg potassium biscuits, smoothies and cereals
Hazelnut considered “more agreeable” in flavor with coffee; supposedly “froths” better thin 110 calories; 3.5 g fat; 120 mg sodium; 16 g carbs; 0 g sugar; 2 g protein coffee, baking, vegan cooking
Oat Void of cholesterol and saturated fats; high in fiber, iron; contains phytochemicals, which can protect against heart disease and some cancers; must be avoided by those that need to adhere to gluten free diet thick and grainy 130 calories; 2.5 g fat; 24 g carbs; 110 mg sodium; 19 g sugar; 120 mg potassium on its own as a beverage, cereal, gravy, cupcakes, hearty cookies
Rice most hypoallergenic option of all milk alternatives; good for blood pressure due to niacin and vitamin B6 content; low in protein; not recommended for diabetics; highly starchy; often enriched with calcium, vitamin A & D watery, thin 70 calories; 2.5 g fat; 80 mg sodium; 23 g carbs; 10 g sugar; 1 g protein; 300 mg calcium; 0 mg potassium; 100 IU vitamin D oatmeal, smoothies and cereals–not recommended to be used in baking or cooking due to watery texture

With cow’s milk allergy reported to be the largest allergy in infants and children, it’s safe to say that these milk substitutes are a valuable resource. What’s your experience with these different milks? Have a particular preference you want to share? If you’re up to the challenge, why not make your own milk?
Sources: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/273982.php

http://www.eatingwithfoodallergies.com/milksubstitutes.html

http://www.wellnesstoday.com/nutrition-recipes/which-nut-milk-is-right-for-you

http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-dd-is-hazelnut-milk-the-new-almond-milk-20140416-story.html

https://www.behance.net/gallery/2681739/Primer-Milk-Alternatives

http://www.pacificfoods.com/food/non-dairy-beverages/nut-grain-beverages/organic-7-grain-original.aspx

https://www.behance.net/gallery/2681739/Primer-Milk-Alternatives

Portfolio Diet


By: Nikki Nies{AE7BD78B-6507-4209-A994-0BCE1D51D5F1}Portfolio-Diet_article

The portfolio diet, created by David J.A. Jenkins, MD, decreases cholesterol levels without any side effects.  The name of the diet derives from the concept of figuratively “investing” in one’s health portfolio.  By investing in the consumption of cholesterol lowering foods, one is ensured of a variety of foods and diversification, just as in a diverse stock portfolio.

Previous diets aim at either cutting out an entire food group, but the portfolio diet looks at the big picture and has 4 key points:

1)   Soy products are consumed in replacement of meat (i.e. soy cold cuts, tofurkey)

2) 3 daily servings of Metamucil; oats and barley are primary source of grains; eggplant and okra are common vegetables consumed

3) replaces butter and margarine with plant sterol enriched margarine (i.e. Benecol, Take Control)

4) Handful of almonds consumed daily

Almonds contain cardio protective monounsaturated fats, antioxidants and vitamin E.  With a daily intake, almonds provide an additional lipid lowering effect.  Soluble fibers, such as oats, prunes, lentils and peas reduce absorption of dietary fat and increase loss of bile acids in feces.  Soluble fiber is found in the form of beta glucans in oats and barley and as pectin in fruits and vegetables.  Total cholesterol levels can be decreased 3-5% if 5-10 g of soluble fibers consumed daily.

health-082511-002-617x411Soy products decreases cholesterol synthesis and increases LDL receptor uptake, with the recommendation of 25 g of soy protein consumed daily.  Phytosterols and stanols compete with cholesterol for absorption and are able to block uptake from gut.

While I was looking at past studies’ evidence regarding the efficacy of the portfolio diet, there was one author I couldn’t get away from.  That name is ‘Jenkins.” As you know, Jenkins is the founder of the portfolio diet and his name is everywhere when it comes to the “research” of this diet.  Without easy access to other researcher’s thoughts on the diet, it makes me question why the research isn’t there.  While Jenkins’ Portfolio diet is not the worst of the worst diets, it’s advertisement of the the vegan diet to reduce chronic disease is questionable.  Extensive studies have proven the positive impact of the adoption of this diet. 7 studies were conducted to assess the effect of the portfolio diet, specifically the consumption of almonds on blood lipid levels in those with hyperlipidemia.  Over a four week period, LDL cholesterol was decreased by 30%, percentage change in LDL: 8.0%, CRP: 0.28; no difference found in blood lipids or CRP between control and experimental group.

Although there is evidence of cholesterol reduction, there have been no studies that have investigated the efficacy of a vegan Portfolio diet on healthy cholesterol levels.  The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Evidence Analysis Library posed the question “What’s the relationship between a portfolio diet containing almonds and cholesterol levels in patients with hyperlipidemia?”

It went on to share that in six of seven studies (with four time series studies, one positive, one neutral study and one randomized cross study), the intake of almonds was found to reduce LDL cholesterol by 30%.  In addition, a self selected portfolio diet that spanned over one year was found to provide a 12.8±2% decrease in LDL cholesterol.  While these numbers are promising, for a diet that has been around since 2003, there are still no present studies that have looked at the “entire diet”

Photo Credit: Lifescript and Red Orbit

1. Keith M, Kuliszewski MA, Liao C, et al. A modified portfolio diet complements medical management to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. Clinical Nutrition. (0).

2. Phillips F. Natural cholesterol lowering with the portfolio diet.Practice Nurse [serial online]. July 23, 2010;40(2):19-22. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA.

3.  Evidence Analysis Library.  from:
http://ada.portalxm.com/eal/evidence.cfm?format_tables=0&format_tables=0&evidence_summary_id=250948

Why I’m a Vegan (My personal, non-preachy, story)


While I’m not a vegan myself, I find it important to better understand other’s food choices. Check out Jess’ story and how she became a vegan herself. Thanks for sharing Jess!