Lacto Ovo vegeterians


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Original Image by Meal Makeover Moms via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

 

Lacto vegetarian (sometimes referred to as a lactarian; from the Latin root lact-, milk) diet is a vegetarian diet that includes dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, and kefir, but excludes eggs. Furthermore, this term is used to describe a vegetarian who does not eat eggs, but does eat dairy products. Many Hindu vegetarians are lacto-vegetarians who avoid eggs for religious reasons while continuing to eat dairy. The prefix “lacto” comes from the Latin word for milk

Some vegetarians eat a wide variety of foods that may include fish, eggs and even meat-based broths. Others are stricter and eat no animal products whatsoever, including honey and gelatin. Lacto vegetarians fall in the middle of the spectrum. They eat milk, yogurt, cheese and other dairy products, but they do not eat eggs or fish

The term “lacto vegetarian” comes from the Latin word lactis, meaning milk. Historically, many lacto vegetarians have followed religions that are widespread in the Far East, such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism, which incorporate nonviolence and respect for animals into their belief systems. In addition to avoiding meat, most lacto vegetarians avoid eggs because they are undeveloped embryos. A lacto-ovo vegetarian eats both eggs and dairy products.

Eating dairy products is the main factor that distinguishes lacto vegetarians from vegans. Lacto vegetarians eat milk and milk products, yogurt, cheese, butter and cream. However, they do not eat dairy products made with gelatin, such as some puddings and custards, because most gelatin contains pulverized animal hooves, bones or marrow. Lacto vegetarians also avoid dairy products containing animal-based rennet, a collection of enzymes that cheese-makers normally get from calves.

Additional foods that do not contain animal products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains and plant-based proteins, make up the rest of a lacto vegetarian diet. Examples include citrus fruits, berries, root vegetables, leafy greens, nuts, seeds, wheat products, oats, corn, beans, legumes and soy products. According to the USDA, a lacto vegetarian diet that is balanced among all of those foods plus dairy items can help reduce risks of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other health problems.

Menu Plan

A lacto vegetarian menu plan can look a lot like a plan for a traditional vegetarian, but without the eggs. A sample breakfast might be oatmeal with milk and berries, a yogurt and granola parfait or a tofu vegetable scramble. Lacto vegetarian lunch options include a green salad with a side of tofu and fruit, meat-free chili or pasta with vegetables and olive oil. For dinner, lacto vegetarians might have a bean burrito, lentil soup with bread and salad or a vegetable curry with rice.

Lacto-ovo vegetarians may have higher blood cholesterol levels because of the eggs they eat, so choosing to follow a lacto vegetarian diet may improve heart health and encourage weight loss or healthy weight maintenance. According to a 2004 study published in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,” self-identified lacto vegetarian women have a lower risk of overweight and obesity than women who eat meat. Additionally, the Mayo Clinic reports that all vegetarians tend to weigh less and consume fewer calories and fat grams than meat eaters.

Sources:http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/lacto-vegetarian-foods-5885.html

http://vegetarian.about.com/od/glossary/g/lactovegetarian.htm

Claims’ Dissection


ct-icons-enBy: Nikki Nies

We’re bombarded by food labels and health claims in grocery stores, food advertisements and in our own kitchens! Yet, can you confidently differentiate between “light” foods and “fat free?” Do you gravitate to “fat free” labeled foods because you can’t reists the word FREE?

  • “Light”: calorie content; a product that advertises “light”, must contain 1/3 fewer calories than comparison food. In regards to fat in food, “light” must refer to 50% or less of fat than in comparison food.
  • “Calorie Free”: fewer than 5 calories per serving
  • “Low Fat”: 3 grams or less of fat than regular
  • “Fat Free”: product contains less than 0.5 g fat; no added fat or oil
  • “Cholesterol Free”: only animal products contain cholesterol, with no more than 2 mg of cholesterol present per serving; 2 g or less of saturated fat per serving may be present
  • “Calorie Free”: fewer than 5 calories per serving

Have an other health terms you find on food products that you find confusing? What health claims have you come across that were skeptical?

Photo Credit: Pixgood

Sources: http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm111447.htm

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Trends/Health-claims

http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm2006877.htm

http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm073992.htm

Danger[s] of Dentures


OlderAdults_225x207By: Nikki Nies

I recently finished up my long term care rotation at the DuPage Convalescent Center (DPCC) in Wheaton, IL. I’m not one to shy away from  helping the older adult population,but I didn’t know too much about what I’d be getting into prior to the rotation.  In the seven weeks that I was at this facility, I quickly became familiar with the facility’s philosophy and way of care.  It’s very telling that during care conferences,many of the residents families’ shared how appreciative they were of the care their loved ones were receiving at DPCC and how they could tell the employees didn’t think of their daily activities as part of just “a job.”

With that said, with the many quarterly, yearly and initial assessments I completed, it became clearer as the days passed that evaluation of one’s oral care, dental and swallowing and chewing impairment affected the resident’s ability to obtain and maintain adequate nutrition.  While dentures aka false teeth can be the solution to said issues, it’s important to keep your dentures and mouth consistently clean.  If you wear ill-fitted dentures for a prolonged time, it can lead to:

  • Gum and/or mouth irritation
  • Problems eating and/or speaking
  • Mouth infections

While with age, change comes, there are preventative ways you can make sure your dentures don’t contribute and/or exacerbate existing conditions.cleaning-denture-instructions-illustration-17037495

  • Make sure to frequent the dentist as gums and bones will change and dentures won’t fit as well and your dentures will need to be adjusted
  • If you have trouble eating, don’t eat anything sticky, chew food slowly, take small bites of soft foods (i.e. eggs and yogurt) and chew foods using both sides of your mouth at the same time, which prevents dentures from moving forward or tipping
  • Use an adhesive to keep dentures in place and make them feel more secure
  • Unless dentist prescribes otherwise, do not sleep with your dentures in, especially after extraction and/or initial use of dentures
  • When holding dentures, stand over a water filled sink or place towel underneath dentures to protect in case dropped.
  • Clean dentures daily by soaking overnight with a denture cleaner and clean in the morning before putting them in your mouth
  • Use a special denture cleaning brush or soft bristled brush
  • Do not use toothpaste, bleach or powdered household cleaners as they are too abrasive
  • Clean and massage gums, tongue and roof of mouth daily prior to putting dentures.
  • Don’t use toothpicks as they can damage dentures

What denture hacks have you used to keep dentures in place? What troubles have you encountered with your dentures?

Photo Credit: Olmsted County and Dreamstime

Sources: http://dentalcarematters.com/getting-used-to-dentures-and-problems/

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/common-denture-problems

http://dentures.net/denture-problems.html

http://denturehelp.com/Pages/PS.html

MyPlate for Older Adults


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Source: http://fycs.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/hnfs/enafs/MyPlate.php

Portions ≠ Servings


By: Nikki NiesPortion-Control

Depending on where you live in the U.S. you may refer to Coca Cola or Sprite as soda, pop or soda pop.  To be honest, I still haven’t gotten used to hearing or interpreting pop as soda even though I’ve been living in the Mid West for the past year.

While soda and pop are synonymous, the same can’t be said about portions and servings.  Yes, it’s understandable how servings and portions could be used interchangeably, but it’s important to recognize the difference and not fall into the pitfalls of “sameness.”

Portion: amount of food we choose to eat

Serving Size: amount of food  recommended by the Dietary Guidelines

If you’re familiar with the Dietary Guidelines then your portions may be line with the suggested serving size.  However, too many people do not discern the difference.  Let’s use some practical application.  The Dietary Guidelines state a serving of pasta, rice and/or couscous is 1/3 of cup.  However, it’s common practice for one to fill the plate up with pasta, which can easily be at least a cup.  In essence, someone’s who’s eating a cup of pasta is eating three servings.

Notable serving sizes:

  • 1 slice of bread
  • 6″ tortilla
  • 1/3 cup of cooked cereal, rice, or pasta
  • 1 cup of raw leafy vegetables
  • 1/2 cup of other vegetables cooked or raw
  • 3/4 cup of vegetable or fruit juice
  • 1 medium apple, banana, orange or  pear
  • 1/2 cup of chopped, cooked, or canned fruit
  • 1 cup of milk or yogurt
  • 1 1/2 ounces of natural cheese (i.e. Cheddar)
  • 2-3 ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish
  • 1/2 cup of cooked dry beans or 1/2 cup of tofu counts as 1 ounce of lean meat
  • 2 tablespoons of peanut butter  or 1/3 cup of nuts counts as 1 ounce of meat

My point is that it’s not a BAD thing to be eating grains, but to make sure you’re aware of how much you’re eating and how much in accordance with the Dietary Guidelines.  The issue that often comes up is that people are eating several servings for several or all their meals on a regular basis.

Motivated to decrease your portion size, but not sure how to start? The best way is to pull out your measuring cups and spoons.  We often times “eye” the amount of food we serve ourselves, but when making these portion changes, it’s good to have a good baseline.   Additionally, join the Smaller Plate Movement, which as its name suggests promotes the use of more appropriately sized plates, bowls and cups.

Worried that you’ll be starving with smaller portions? I wouldn’t worry yet! You might be surprised that you’re actually more satisfied with your meals with smaller portions because you really got to enjoy the meals.

I’ve written a lot about portion control on this blog, how portions have changed over the years to what a portion is, but all this information is relevant and important to know to make those permanent healthier lifestyle changes! What progress have you made lately?

Photo Credit: High Heeled Life

Sources:http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=4294967941

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/wecan/eat-right/distortion.htm

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/HealthierKids/HowtoMakeaHealthyHome/Portion-Size-Versus-Serving-Size_UCM_304051_Article.jsp

http://www.eatrightontario.ca/en/Articles/Nutrition-Labelling/Understanding-Portion-Sizes#.U_vegmRdXM0

http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2000/document/build.htm

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/portion_size_vs_serving_size

https://www.pulseos.com/blog/body/body-mass/healthy-weight-portion-control/

Healthy Eating in College


eating_healthy_in_college1By: Nikki Nies

With the impending semester upon us, it’s never too early to talk about healthy dining on campus.  While freshmen are often times required to buy a meal plan with tuition, those living in nearby apartments or are juggling school and home responsibilities, the stress of school can quickly get to students.  Unfortunately, the first habit to go is eating healthy.  Yet, it doesn’t make sense to opt for cheesy fries that don’t have as much energy producing qualities as a strawberry banana smoothie when the time crunch is really being felt!

I admit, I find myself eating on the go more often than not, but that doesn’t mean I’m going through McDonald’s drive thru or grabbing a Hot Pocket out of the microwave on my way out! With careful planning before the work load gets into the “meat” of things, you can set up your semester with some healthier options.

Planning ahead for upcoming semester, trimester or quarter, use the following suggestions for long term use:

  • Have a mini fridge in your dorm and/or access to fridge in apartment or suite for on the go breakfast items, such as a piece of fruit, yogurt,string cheese and/or pb&j  to store leftovers and to have produce on hand!
  • Opt for “healthier” options at fast food chains.  Order salads with dressings on the side, pizza with half the cheese, roast beef sandwich, sweet potato and/or fruit cup.  Limit the high fat, greasier options, such as French fries, fish sandwiches and/or fried chicken.
  • Monitor your sugar intake, which tend to quickly add up quickly.  Often times, coffee creamers, cookies, cocktails, cereals are packed with sugar.  Not sure how to check the sugar content? Here’s how to read a nutrition fact label.
  • Keep your room or apartment stocked with healthier snacks so you’re not tempted to head for the vending machines or order late night pizza.  Next time you’re at the grocery store, grab some pretzels, unbuttered popcorn, rice cakes, whole wheat crackers, hummus and/or granola.
  • Keep a reusable water bottle on hand!  It’s important to stay hydrated throughout the day.  It’s common for people to mistake thirst for hunger, plus drinking regular bouts of water can keep you focused.
  • Take advantage of the dining hall’s salad bar! Fill up on fresh fruits and veggies, but go easy on the salad dressing!  Vegetables are very filling for few calories!cafeteria
  • Attempt to eat meals on a consistent basis.  Yes, college is known to be hectic and one may not always a have a set schedule, but eat when you’re hungry and avoid skipping meals as much as possible.
  • Recognize your body’s cues.  I understand it’s a lot easier said than done, but listen to your body as it tells you when it’s hungry and when it’s full.  No need to overeat, that’s what leftovers are for!
  • Recognize portion sizes and stick to them.  You often need less food than you think or may like to fill you up! You’ll let meals stretch longer, while sticking to the recommended portion sizes.
  • Limit alcohol intake.  Alcohol is packed with calories, but provides few nutrients.
  • If you’re going grocery shopping.  Mix it up! It’s easy to get bored eating the same meals day after day and to opt for late night pizza, but don’t give in!
  • Fill up on calcium. Just because you’ve graduated high school, doesn’t necessarily mean you’re done growing.  Make sure to eat enough calcium rich foods to continue to prevent osteoporosis. You don’t have to be entirely dependent on milk for your calcium, so keep on hand low fat yogurt, green leafy vegetables and/or low fat cheese
  • If you’re out and your stomach’s growling, don’t feel guilty about grabbing fast food.  Sometimes you have to eat what’s available, eating fast food once in a while isn’t going to kill you.  It’s when such habits become a weekly and then daily habit one should worry.

Yes, this is a lot of information to remember, but you don’t have to add all these suggestions tomorrow.  People tend to be more successful long term with small, gradual changes.

Photo Crdit: Diets in Review and Healthy eating in College

Sources:https://www.med.umich.edu/pfans/docs/tip-2012/budget-0812.pdf

http://www.clarke.edu/page.aspx?id=6510

http://jdrf.org/life-with-t1d/college/top-10-tips-for-eating-healthy-in-college/

http://bestfoodsforyourhealthfrieda.blogspot.com/2013/10/shrink-your-belly-in-14-days-routine.html

Food for thought: The challenge of healthy eating on campus

http://www.healthline.com/health/fast-food-effects-on-body

Middle Eastern Flavor Exposure


By: Nikki Nies

Original Image by Divya Thakur via Flickr
Original Image by Divya Thakur via Flickr

You know how you get giddy when you’re able to share a passion or interest with some one and they “get” the hype?  My friend from Wisconsin doesn’t have a lot of access to authentic Asian restaurants back home.  I found this past weekend to be the best time to introduce her to ethnic foods! The best part, she loved it!

After she had stuffed herself with the new flavor combinations, she inquired what food had she eaten.  Was it Japanese or Chinese? I corrected her telling her that since we had kimchi, it was Korean.  I wasn’t offended because she had a genuine interest in knowing exactly what she ate.  I brushed it off, stating I wouldn’t know what Middle Easterns eat besides hummus.  The Middle East consists of Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey.

My conversation with her and a recent discussion I had in my Public Health class regarding culture sensitivity got me questioning why I didn’t know off the top of my head Middle Eastern traditional cuisines.  That’s my lead in to this blog post.

I’m taking this blog post as a way to increase not only your awareness of what it mean to be eating Middle eastern food and recognizing some differences within the regions.  As there are distinct tastes and ingredients in Asian cooking, it’s not fair to clump Middle Eastern cuisine under one blog post, but there are more similarities than differences in these Middle Eastern nations.  Ingredients that are commonly seen in such cooking and dishes include dates, olives, wheat, rice, legumes, and
lamb.

The Middle Eastern diet consists of the American MyPlate food groups, but has distinct emphasis on certain foods within the food groups.

Food Group      Customary Traditions
Dairy
  • More common to eat fermented dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt
  • Whole milk’s often used in desserts and puddings
  • Most common cheese: feta
Protein
  • Very common: lamb, kosher beef, kosher poultry, herring, lox and sardines
  • Pork is only eaten on Christmas
  • Pork is not eaten by Muslims or those that are Jewish
  • Less likely to see dairy and shellfish within the same meal
  • Common: black, kidney and navy beans, chick peas and lentils
Vegetables
  • Most popular: eggplant
  • Preferred to be used in raw or mixed salad with fruit
  • Can be seen stuffed in rice and/or meats
  • Olive oil commonly used in prep
  • Black and green olives are popular in many dishes
Fruits
  • Regularly seen in desserts and/or snacks
  • Fresh is the most desired kind of fruit type
  • Often used in compotes and jams if fresh fruit isn’t feasible
  • Flavorings regularly includes lemons
Grains
  • Wheat, barley or rice are often included in meals
  • Common grains: couscous, burghul, pita bread, freekeh,matzoh and/or unleavened bread
  • Filo dough frequently found in desserts

Overview of Middle Eastern Staples: 

Original Image by Mr.TinDC via Flickr
Original Image by Mr.TinDC via Flickr
  • Ful Medames: An Egyptian and Sudanese breakfast dish made from fava beans, olive oil, parsley, garlic and lemon; often served with a fried egg and pita bread
  • Manakeesh: Similar to U.S. pizza, a round bread with ground meat, herbs and/or cheese; preferably for breakfast or lunch
  • Grilled Halloumi: Cheese made from goat and sheep milk; no acid or bacteria are used during processing
  • Shanklish: Golf size cheese balls; rolled in herbs or chili flakes
  • Falafel: Deep fried ball or patty made of chick peas, fava beans or a combination of both; often served with tomatoes, sliced onion and romaine lettuce
  • Moutabal/baba ghanoush (aka baba ganush, baba ghannouj or baba ghannoug): Dip with an eggplant(aubergine)dish; aubergine often baked or broiled over an open flame to provide a smokey taste; sometimes eaten with pita bread
  • Fattoush (aka fattush, fatush, fattoosh,and fattouche): A Levantine tangy salad containing lettuce, onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, olive oil and mint; part of the fattat dish group–all being made from stale bread as its base
  • Tabouleh: A vegetarian salad dish composed of tomatoes, parsley, mint, onion, olive oil, salt and lemon juice; can be modified for personal tastes
  • Shanklish: Golf size cheese balls; rolled in herbs or chili flakes
  • Mezze: Collection of small dishes that are picked at leisure: cheese, melon, nuts, various salads and dips, such as tabbouleh, hummus, mutabbal and/or pickles
  • Shish Tawook: Skewered chicken dish; can be served with French fries or pita bread
  • Dolma: Grape leaves, chard, and cabbage stuffed with rice, ground meat, pine nuts, and spices.  Will be stewed in oil and tomato
  • Kofta: Common Pakistani or Iranian dish; minced lamb or beef balls; served with its own spicy sauce
  • Kibbeh (aka kibbe): A Turkish dish made of bulghur, minced onions and finely ground meat; most common: torpedo shaped fried croquette with minced meat
  • Shawarma:Meat, such as lamb, turkey, beef or veal are placed on spit for hours at a time; shavings cuts off for serving; usually eaten with tabouleh, fattoush, taboon bread, tomato and cucumbers
  • Quwarmah Al Dajaj: Curried chicken; has lime, ginger, turmeric, baharat, cumin, cardamom, black pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, paprika
  • Mansaf: Mutton with yogurt sauce; sprinkled with almonds and pine nuts
  • Umm Ali: Egyptian bread pudding; made with milk and cream; can contain vanilla, pistachios, condensed milk, raisins and/or croissant piece
  • Knafeh: cheesecake made of Nabusi cheese
  • Kebab Karaz (aka cherry kebab or desert candy): Syrian candy that contains sour cherries and pomegranate pip
  • Baklava: pastry made of filo dough; can contain nuts, sweet syrup and honey

I’m sure I’ve left out at least one or two staples, yet only a true Middle Eastern could share from experience.  If any one has any particular food staples in their house, please enlighten us!

Sources: http://travel.cnn.com/20-best-middle-east-dishes-324556

http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/formsandpubs/publications/CaliforniaFoodGuide/20HealthandDietaryAffectingEasternEuropeansandMiddleEasterners.pdf

http://www.bonappetit.com/tag/middle-eastern-food

http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/pdf/5256.pdf

http://www.nal.usda.gov/foodstamp/Topics/ethnic.htm

http://www.semda.org/info/pyramid.asp?ID=1

http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/bibs/gen/ethnic.html#12

http://www.eatrightny.org/nutrition_resources/files/CulturalNutritionResources.pdf

http://www.pbs.org/food/cuisine/middle-eastern/

http://mideastfood.about.com/od/middleeasternfood101/tp/popularmideast.htm

“Some” White After Labor Day is Okay!


By: Nikki Nies white-foods

Refined sugar and bread give the white food group a bad rap, but there are many white colored foods that are worth mentioning.  While the color white’s not technically part of the rainbow, it’s still a color that shouldn’t be ignored!

Unfortunately there’s this generalization that all carbs are bad for you.  Yes, cookies, cake, ice cream and sweetened beverages should be consumed in moderation as their nutritional value is limited, they’re easy to overeat and aren’t filling.  The body processes refined grains quickly through the body, feeling hungry soon after.

In replacement, adding more “smart carbs” into daily meals will help you forget those cravings.  Smart carbs, you ask? Yes! The human body needs carbohydrates for basic bodily function, as it’s the main source of energy.  Smart carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and low fat dairy products.

The difference between the carbs that are recommended in moderate amounts and the smart carbs is within the processing and amount of fiber.  Most refined carbs have been stripped of their bran, which is the most fibrous part of the whole grain.

However moderation of all white foods isn’t completely needed.  There are some white foods, such as cauliflower, shallot, leeks, garlic, onions, white turnips, parsnips, kohlrabi, white corn, mushrooms and turnips that are great natural, unprocessed white colored foods.  The alium group–garlic, shallots, leeks and onions are all sulfur rich foods.  This means they help blood circulation, anti inflammatory, diuretic and antibiotic properties.  It’s recommended to eat at least one high allium food a day.

Additional great white foods include tilapia, halibut, whitefish, cod, haddock, milk, tofu , buttermilk, yogurt, and cottage cheeese, but we’ll talk about those at a later date!

Next time you’re restocking your pantry, make sure to grab some onions, garlic and mushrooms! They’ll keep you fuller longer, help you meet your fiber needs and slow absorption, I swear!

Photo Credit: Calorie Count

Sources:http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/truth-about-white-foods

http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/health/blog/nutrition/2013/11/5_white_foods_that_should_be_o.html

http://www.foodandwine.com/slideshows/white-foods/1

http://www.parenting.com/gallery/10-white-foods-for-picky-eaters

Kefir


By: Nikki Nies kefir

Kefir, a fermented milk drink made of fermenting milk with kefir grains,polysacharides and  yeast, impacts the way foods are digested.  While it’s not commonly found in your local Dollar Store, kefir is worth the investment. Cultured milk products have been around for more decades than can be counted, yet asking someone to ask about some of the health benefits of kefir, is not always easy.

Probiotics are found in foods such as yogurt and may be found in some dietary supplements.

Health benefits of kefir:

  • May help treat diarrhea, esp. if antibiotics have been recently used
  • Treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Prevent or treat eczema
  • Prevent or reduce the severity of colds
  • Contains lactobaccilus caucasus, leuconostoc, Acetobacter species, Streptococcus species, Saccharomyces kefir and Torula kefir–which are beneficial bacteria that help with digestive health and prevent the growth of harmful microorganisms
  • Can help facilitate the production of vitamin K and B12 in the gut
  • Through the fermenting process of kefir, it’s lactose free

One cup of kefir provides 8-11 g of protein.  It also provides 10% of the day’s recommended vitamin A content and 25% of the day’s vitamin D. Based on a 2,000 calorie diet, kefir provides 30% of the day’s calcium needs.

While probiotics aren’t a required food item to maintain one’s health, consumption of these microorganisms can aid in digestion and provide protection from harmful bacteria.  While none of the health claims for kefir have not been scientifically proven, how can you not deny the great nutrients! Some have complained that use of kefir can lead to intestinal cramping and/or constipation with initial use. 

Sources: http://www.kefir.net/

http://www.emedicinehealth.com/kefir-page2/vitamins-supplements.htm

http://www.lifeway.net/LifewayWorld/KefirProbiotics/Kefir.aspx

http://www.livestrong.com/article/449940-what-are-the-benefits-of-kefir/

http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=728420&storeId=10052&langId=-1

http://www.lifeway.net/LifewayWorld/OurStory.aspx

http://www.oprah.com/health/Yogurt-and-Kefir-Dr-Perricones-No-10-Superfood

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/consumer-health/expert-answers/probiotics/faq-20058065

Debunking Weight Loss Myths!


By: Nikki Nies Weight-Loss-Myths460

“Magic pills” and “detoxification systems” that promise instant weight loss have been around for years.  In the 21st century, the market continues to meet the demand of the such products, yet many of these so called products do not provide the advertised weight loss.

While the bombardment of which products can be overwhelming, be careful what you shell out money for.  The table I’ve created below provides examples of weight loss claims that have not been found efficacious with using such products.

Instead, diet and regular bouts of exercise are the still proven tried and trued method of losing and maintaining weight loss.

If I skip meals, I’ll lose weight quicker
  • Can lead to becoming overly hungry → overeat at next meal
  • Those that skip breakfast tend to be heavier than those that consume at least 3 meals/day

o   Quick breakfast options: whole wheat toast with fruit spread or oatmeal with low fat yogurt and berries

Fad diets will help me lose weight and keep it off
  • Often promise quick fixes with food restrictions and/or avoidance of food groups/types of food
  • Hard to follow
  • May not provide all nutrients one needs
  • Being on a diet of fewer than 800 calories a day for a long time may lead to serious heart problems.
  • Losing >3#/wk can increase risk of developing gallstones

o   Safe wt loss: 0.5-2#/wk

Carbs are fattening. I should limit.
  • Carbs are body’s main source of energy
  • Limit simple, not complex!

o   Simple: candy, cake, cookies, sugar sweetened desserts/drinks and alcohol

o   Complex: fruits, vegetables, whole grains

  • Opt for brown rice, whole-wheat bread, cereal, and pasta
“Low fat” and “Fat free”=0 Calories
  • Low fat and fat free products have calories, but may be less than full fat
  • Many processed foods have the same amount of calories whether low fat or full fat
  • Processed foods that state they’re low fat/fat free may have added flour, salt, starch, or sugar to improve flavor and texture after fat is removed, which contain added calories
When dieting, one can’t eat fast food!
  • Yes, fast food can be bad for you
  • Opt for:

o   Avoid “value” combo meals as more calories than you need in one meal.

o   Choose fresh fruit or nonfat yogurt for dessert

o   Limit use of high fat/calorie toppings

  • i. e. bacon, cheese, reg mayo, salad dressing

o   Pick steamed or baked items over fried

o   Sip on water or fat-free milk instead of soda

o   Choose soft instead of hard tacos

Snacking is always a bad idea!
  • In between meal snacking can prevent overeating at meals
  • Can benefit from 5 small meals a day
  • Great choice: nuts, low fat cheese, yogurt or an apple
Eating healthy costs more!
  • Canned and frozen fruits and veggies can provide same nutrients as fresh at a lower cost
  • Great sources of protein: tuna, lentils, beans and peas
  • In the end, health care costs will be less expensive!

What weight loss claims have you encountered that isn’t listed in the table? Have any specific questions regarding weight loss claims you’ve heard that you’re not sure about? Ask away!

Sources:

http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/myths.htm

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/weight-loss-myths-debunked/story?id=19548576

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/01/health/wrong-weight-loss-myths/

http://www.active.com/nutrition/articles/6-weight-loss-myths-debunked%5B/embed%5D