Yes, I’m a Brinkerhead!


Image by Brinker Media Room goo.gl/BGM0Hn
Image by Brinker Media Room goo.gl/BGM0Hn

By: Nikki Nies

As of 5/4/15, I can proudly call myself a Brinkerhead! A head of what, you say?! You heard me, I’m a Brinkerhead, otherwise known as an employee at  Brinker International!  While you might not be familiar with the company Brinker International, I’m sure you’ve come across the restaurant name Chili’s or Maggiano’s once or twice!  Brinker International is the headquarters of said companies, priding itself as a multinational hospitality company.

I’ve been at Brinker for almost 2 months and have taken advantage of every learning opportunity that has come my way or which I’ve saught! What I’ve learned so far:

  • My primary role at Brinker has been to provide nutrition information for Maggiano’s banquets. While I had previously been to a Maggiano’s for a business event, I wasn’t aware of all the menus that Maggiano’s has: delivery, carry out, children’s, dessert, wine & beverage, family style, family style lunch, all day meeting, breakfast & brunch, etc. There is some crossover from the dining room, but a good portion of the banquet menu items need their own nutrition analysis as portions are different (i.e. Banquets uses a lot of ‘mini’ versions of dining room menu items).
  • Brinker uses ESHA Genesis Food Processor as the primary tool of nutrient analysis. Working with my supervisor, Ms. Alisa Via-Reque, RD, we’ve consulted with the chefs numerous times to better understand the recipes. I’ve had the opportunity prep materials for lab testing, which requires everything from coordinating the lab’s courier, to weighing the raw weight of the tested item, with breading, the edible portion (i.e. with shrimp’s tail off) and vacuum packing the products for delivery to lab.
  • I had the opportunity to partake in a ‘Culture of Accountability’ workshop, which enlightened me on the values and culture of Brinker. We’re all here to obtain desired results and obtaining results requires providing and obtaining feedback. Yes, feedback can be a sore subject, but it doesn’t have to be.
    no2[1]
  • Called the ‘ops experience’, I was able to work the Back of the House and the Front of the House of Maggiano’s Willow Bend in Plano, TX. I have a greater appreciation of all the work that goes into delivering a quality, fresh meal! Many restaurants claim they’re making homemade, scratch kitchen meals, but when you can take the ‘processed’ ingredients, the credibility of chain’s claims fall through. Not at Maggiano’s! I wish everyone could see what the kitchen is like! As someone said, the restaurant business isn’t ‘for the lazy.’ I’ve been working closely with the recipes, which I was proud to see that the kitchen staff follow to a tee. This brings me great pride as I know that the nutrition information that is being provided by Brinker is credible and there aren’t any ‘add ons’ being put in by the staff themselves.
  • While Maggiano’s is in a mere 47 locations, as of July 2015, it does extremely well for itself! In comparison to Chili’s 1500 locations, Maggiano’s is able to hold its own, with its banquets driving a good portion of the business!  Professional meetings and socials are equally a favorable outing to gather at Maggiano’s. With buffet lines, omelet, pasta and/or carving station, there are menu items for all to enjoy!

I’ve learned so much in the past couple months and have enjoyed soaking up as much of the corporate culture as I can. Brinker knows how to have fun while getting the serious work done first! My kind of life! Can’t wait to see what the next few months bring, I’ve been blessed!

Sources:http://www.brinker.com/company/ourstory.asp

Calorie Detective


By: Nikki Nies

Food establishments that have 20+ locations are required to post food calorie amounts of food offered with the new Obamacare regulations. The idea is that when you know how much you’re eating, you’ll tend to eat less. Yet, Casey Neistat finds the calories provided can be inaccurate.

Original Image by Brett Jordan via Flickr
Original Image by Brett Jordan via Flickr

While the NYC Health Code states that the Health Dept. will cite violations if calories aren’t posted. However, accuracy isn’t required.

With the resources of the Obesity Research lab at St. Luke’s Hospital, a calorimeter was used to test 5 items in 10 hours. Check out the following calorie discrepancies found:

  1. At Grandma’s, the  Original Banana Nut Muffin, it was reported it had 640 calories. However, with Neistat’s fine tooth comb and calorimeter, it was found the banana nut muffin actually had 734.7 calories!
  2. With the Starbucks Grande Coffee Frappuccino with whipped cream, it’s reported it’s a mere 370 calories. However, it’s 392.9 calories. Not too bad off.
  3. In a custom made Chipotle Barbacoa burrito, Chipotle’s online burrito stated it would come out to me 1175 calories. The calorimeter found the burrito to be 10% more calories, at 1295 calories.
  4. One of Neiget’s favorite “Healthy” spicy tofu sandwiches, which was listed to be 228 calories, but was actually 548.4 calories, nearly double the listed calorie amount!
  5. At Subway, the 6″ turkey sandwich rang in accurately! The sandwich is listed as 360 calories and the calorimeter found it be 350.8 calories, 97.4% of the 360 calories listed!

Multiple samples were not tested for validity or reliability, but with Neistat’s experiment, it confirms that we can not believe every nutrition or health claim provided.  If Neiget had gone by the calories listed on the packaged food, he would have consumed an EXTRA 548.5c alories he was unaware of. What does this mean? Can we forgive a 10% margin? Are we being too hard on the restaurant and food industry? This is up for debate. Discuss!

Sources: http://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000002061153/calorie-detective.html

Q&A with Sports Nutritionist: Dawn Jackson Blatner


unnamedBy: Nikki Nies

I recently had the pleasure to interview Dawn Jackson Blatner, RDN, CSSD (DJB), a sports dietitian based in Chicago, Illinois. On behalf of We Dish Nutrition (WDN), I enjoyed  checking out what Dawn’s been up to and learning more about what a sports dietitian does!  Thank you Dawn for taking the time to chat with me!

WDN: How do you approach or respond to others that seem to have a different food philosophy from you?

DJB: I trade judgment for curiosity. I ask questions, point out similarities to find common ground and I respectfully disagree when diet principles are based in fad instead of facts. I believe in real food, more fun and no B.S.

WDN: When you hear the word “Flexitarian” what immediately comes to mind?

DJB: Flexitarians are pro-plants, not anti-meat. I wrote The Flexitarian Diet because it’s how I eat. I’m a plant-loving vegetarian who is flexible enough to enjoy meat, poultry, and fish occasionally.

WDN: What are your key responsibilities as the nutrition consultant for the Chicago Cubs? How did you go about becoming a consultant for them?

DJB: This is my 6th season as the Chicago CUBS nutrition consultant and every season has been so different. Here are some examples of what I do: Develop recipes & review menus, meet with players individually, give team talks, post inspirational nutrition signs, and create fun ways to present healthy food such as a superfood smoothie station & superfood travel packs.

I love this saying: “Let success find you based on your incredible energy for serving.” I got the initial job interview because the team doctor heard about my hard work & enthusiasm for helping people (word of mouth). I got the job because I was authentic – honest about what skills & passions I have (and don’t have).

WDN: What advice do you have for students and other RDs looking to enter the sports nutrition field?

DJB: Start now! Start doing sports nutrition for anybody. Write about it in your gym’s newsletter, donate a handout for a kids soccer league, create presentations for your yoga studio – get creative. Jobs come to those who are DOING – it doesn’t matter where you start – just start serving. Also, get INVOLVED in the Academy’s SCAN DPG to be around inspiring people & events.

WDN: While each athletes’ nutrition needs may differ, what is one core recommendation you provide to all your clients?

DJB_about dawnDJB: Food is energy. Junk food = junk energy. Clean food = clean energy. Don’t get worked up about the details, get the big things right: Sleep, hydrate and enjoy a variety of nourishing, real food.

WDN: What do you find to be the biggest barriers for people to overcome unhealthy eating habits in the time crunched, rushed society we live in?

DJB: Biggest barrier: They don’t make it fun. Magical things happen when people are excited about what they are doing. “Saying you don’t have time is like saying you don’t want to.” So, I encourage clients to think about what they actually WANT to change…and then it’s easier for them to make the time.

WDN: How do you juggle all of your responsibilities? As a nutrition consultant for the Cubs, as a food and nutrition blogger with Huffington Post, as a nutrition expert on the advisory board of Fitness Magazine while maintaining a fantastic website and balancing work and life responsibilities?

DJB: I slow down, to do more. I used to feel panicked and anxious. Now, I breathe & mindfully prioritize one thing at a time. Advice I follow: Enjoy the process of work, don’t just work for the outcome. Meaning, instead of just rushing to check things off my to-do list, I enjoy doing the little daily tasks. Makes for much more joy in work & life.

DJB_let's work togetherWDN: What projects are you currently working on?

DJB: I just finished my new book featuring a new, FUN approach to eat more superfoods (out in 2016). I’m currently working on an interactive online nutrition course for clients who want my philosophy in a self-study format instead of private sessions. Oh and I launched my new website, I’d love for you to check it out: www.dawnjacksonblatner.com.

Want to learn more about Dawn? Connect with her today! Facebook | Twitter  | Pinterest | Instagram | Nutrition W.O.W. Newsletter Contact

Photo Credit: Dawn Jackson Blatner

Seventh Day Adventist’s Mindful Practices


5631471286_89751eab62_o
Original Image by Bobbi Bowers via Flickr

 

By: Nikki Nies

While studying for my RD exam, I’ve come across and have been quizzed on various ethnic cultures and dietary restrictions. As you have seen, I’ve read more about dietary practices during the Lenten season and have delved further into what Kosher really means. Up until now, I’ve had a pretty good idea about what those dietary practices entailed, but the diet of Seventh Day Adventist is foreign to me. Do you feel the same way? Not quite sure what Seventh Day Adventist means?

Join me in the fun of learning all the details now! While the Seventh Day Adventist church promotes autonomy, the relationships in the church are meant to call one another higher, to live as positive examples of God’s love and devotion. In regards to diet and health, this means:

  • Gluttony and excess are to limited
  • The key to wellness is balance and temperance
  • Limit alcohol, tobacco and mind altering drugs, which can affect clear minds and wise choices
  • It’s believed a well balanced vegetarian diet that emphasizes legumes, whole grains, fruits, nuts, vegetables and sources of vitamin B12 will promote optimal health
  • Like the MyPlate guidelines, Adventists are advised to limit processed foods, sugar, sugar substitutes and food additives.

To remind you, a vegetarian diet has more benefits than the costs of the abstinence of meat. A vegetarian diet continues to provide evidence of lower risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes,obesity and/or high blood pressure.

Being vegetarian isn’t a requirement to be part of the Seventh Day Adventist church, yet many of the church go beyond the vegetarian diet,either eating raw foods or vegan. One of its founders, ellen White’s vision for the Seventh Day Adventist included eight principles for a healthy lifestyle: fresh air, sunshine, abstemiousness, rest, exercise, nutrition, water and trust in a divine power. The second part of the White’s vision included the establishment and devotion of health reform, health education and treating the ill in a new way.

As you can see, Seventh Day Adventist’s dietary practices are very similar to those of vegetarians, if not more strict. I’m proud to see the founder, White’s vision and principles for the church have been upheld since inception in the 1860s. For any of you that are practicing Seventh Day Adventist’s are there any key practices that I’ve missed? What personal practices do you follow in your daily life?

Sources: http://www.adventist.org/vitality/health/

http://www.adventist.org/beliefs/ http://www.seventhdayadventistdiet.com/

https://www.adventistarchives.org/fundamental-beliefs-of-seventh-day-adventists.pdf

WIC Resources


By: Nikki Nies

I recently completely my last dietetic internship rotation at Will County WIC! During my time, I was able to create several handouts and provide resources that would be distributed to future mothers and families.

Today, I’ve provided a copy of the handout I made to gather more information on maternal nutrition and early childhood nutrition. Make sure to check out these resources today!

twtr

Winter [DI] Bucket List


By: Nikki Nies

With the holidays around the corner and responsibilities winding down, add these All Access Internships Bucket List items to your list of fun! Enjoy the holiday season!

Untitled

While I’m not necessarily applying for dietetic internships, I find these bucket list items a great “check list” of mingling, networking and improving your craft within the nutrition field. If you have an interest in writing for a blog-whether to get your feet wet or to become a more active writer, We Dish Nutrition would love to have you write! Email us at wedishnutrition@gmail.com or nikkinies@gmail.com for more information! Additionally, I myself am taking the bucket list as a personal challenge this winter and so should you!

Chili’s Hot Flavors + [Some] Nutrients


https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=AET_RtM6oxE

By: Nikki Nies

Unlike a typical restaurant review, which includes the evaluation of wait staff service, ambiance, and/or décor, we’re reviewing restaurants a bit differently! Sensational Sustenance is redirecting one’s attention to the nutrient content of specific menu items! We aim to not only evaluate the flavors in the entrees, but how nutrient rich entrees are in relation to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans using our own proprietary score sheet:  Healthy Food Critic’s Ultimate Review Form for Restaurant Entrees.  I recently made a trip to Chili’s to check out what dishes they have and Chili’s Restaurant Evaluation!

Described as a “family-friendly chain serving classic Tex-Mex & American fare in a Southwestern-style setting”, Chili’s originated in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but has done a tremendous job in expanding to a national level, with over 1500 locations ubiquitously found throughout the 50 states.  Since inception of their Tex Mex regular menu, the company now proudly offers a nutrition menu, allergen menu, vegetarian menu and offer veggie burgers supplied by Kellogg Company.  It’s been a few years since I’ve been to Chili’s, so my first impression of it’s menu as “vibrant” “loud” and “inviting!” I was ready for a delicious ride of flavors!

While perusing the menu, I chuckled that the Lighter Choice (LC) options were in the back of the menu.  While the acronym LC is sprinkled throughout the menu, it’s not until you’ve passed the appetizers, make your own burgers campaign, the quesadilla section and pass Go to collect your $100 that you reach the LC section.  With a closer look at the LC section, there’s an explanation of the dishes under 650 calories or less that a consumer can grasp the concept of LC.  After debating between salmon or tilapia, I opted for the Mango Chile Tilapia (550 calories) described as “with 6 pepper blend, drizzled with spicy habanero mango glaze and topped with chopped mango, cilantro, house made pico de gallo and fresh diced avocado.  Served with rice and steamed broccoli” at $10.99.

Original Image by Mike Mozart via Flickr
Original Image by Mike Mozart via Flickr

When I ordered my tilapia, I was asked if I wanted to the broccoli and/or rice with the tilapia or if I wanted any of the other sides Chili has to offer.  I thought about ordering the Spiced Panko Onion Rings, Homestyle Fries, Sweet Potato Fries, Southwestern Mac ‘n’ Cheese, Loaded Mashed Potatoes, Mashed Potatoes with Black Pepper Gravy, Sweet Corn on the Cob, Black Beans and/or Cinnamon Apples.  However, if you deviate from the original menu listing, the alternative options to broccoli and rice didn’t seem to elevate the nutritional content of the dish. Therefore, I kept the order as is.

hvkWhen the dish arrived, I was pleased by vivid variety of flavor, with the distinct mango and habanero smelled great! The visual layout of the dish, a rectangle dish instead of the usual circular dish, made it easy to eat–combining broccoli or rice with the tilapia for a good blend of flavors.

After evaluating the dish, I was able to retrieve further nutrition information on the mango chile tilapia on Chili’s website: 550 calories; 21 g of fat; 4.5 g of saturated fat; 0 g trans fat; 70 mg cholesterol; 1600 mg of sodium; 56 g of carbohydrates; 8 g of fiber; 13 g of sugar; 38 g of protein.  In comparison to the evaluations’ healthy option measures, the tilapia met some, but not all parameters.  The breakdown:

Healthy Option Parameters1 Mango Chile Tilapia Nutrient Content
600 calories or less 550 calories ✓
At least 50% is fruit or non-starchy vegetables Contained mango, avocado, steamed broccoli and tilapia  ✓
Grain based item are at least 50% whole grains No indication of whole grain rice  
Total fat is less than 30% of total calories Total fat was 34.5% of calories–550 calories contain 190 calories from fat
Sodium is less than 750 mg 1600 mg
Low in added sugars N/A
Less than 10% of calories from saturated fat 4.5 g of saturated fat ✓

1Healthy Option Parameters are based upon the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for American

Visually, I would estimate I received ½ cup steamed broccoli, ½ cup rice and 3-4 oz. of tilapia.  Based on recommended healthy portions, I would say this was “just about [the] right” amount of food. In hindsight, I’m glad I stuck with the rice and broccoli as my sides as they added the right balance of flavors to counteract spiciness of the pico de gallo and habanero from the tilapia.

I was beyond impressed with the flavors of the mango chile and found the price was accurately listed.  In my eyes, fish is always, and appropriately so, more expensive than meat options. Again, in regards to this dish, my senses walked away very satisfied, rating the dish “liking very much.” The necessary flavors for an interesting dish were present, with evidence that thought was put into the development of the dish.

I understand Chili’s is promoting their “make their own” burgers, but instead of using LC as a obligatory side note, Chili’s could profit from using LC as a more health conscious fast casual restaurant.  They certainly scored better in my book in comparison to my recent trip to Maggiano’s.

Photo Credit: Printable Coupons

MSNW Thesis Presentation!


By: Nikki Nies IMG_8331

Yesterday, I had the pleasure to present my Master’s in Nutrition and Wellness thesis presentation with my fellow colleagues! With the generous help and mentoring from Dr. Bonnie Beezhold, we successfully presented on the Associations with stress: A cross-sectional comparison of wellness in older adults.  My main focus on the study was health and lifestyle factors’ affect on depressive symptoms of the two sites: vowed religious community and independent retirement community.

Background: In the U.S., we have an aging population; the U.S. Census Bureau projects that by 2050, 20% of the U.S. population will be over the age of 65. According to the American Psychological Association, older adults are likely to report less stress than younger generations, but still report stress levels higher than what they think of as a healthy range. In older adults, increased stressful life events can lead to an increase in depressive symptoms.

Many lifestyle factors, including diet, can impact our mood and stress levels. Older adults do not meet dietary guidelines for their age, they often eat less fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and more total fat and saturated fat than recommended. Poor dietary choices in the elderly can have negative outcomes on physical and mental health. Aging is also associated with increasing BMI and body fat which are related to increased blood pressure, blood glucose and lipids.

We were given an opportunity through our contact with Father David to work with the Benedictine Monks at St. Procopius Abbey, the institution that founded our university. This is a group of older men who live in a cohesive community based in religious values. This opportunity made us curious about the impact of living environment on stress and other health and lifestyle factors, and so our research question was shaped by this population. Past literature indicated that a religious community can positively impact wellness, a 32 year follow up study of 144 nuns and 138 laypersons in Italy found that those living in a religious community had a more stable blood pressures, a common measure of stress, throughout the study compared to the control group. Another study, in the Netherlands focused on the relationship between a Monastic lifestyle and mortality. In the 1,523 Benedictine and Trappist Monks, the religious lifestyle was associated with longer life expectancy. Based on the previous literature, we hypothesized that older adults living in a vowed religious community would have less stress and healthier dimensions of mental and physical wellness than those living in a retirement community.

Major Results: When analyzing the data, we found that the distribution of the data was not normal therefore we used nonparamtetric tests to assess the data. The sample consisted of 67 independent older adults aged 65 years and older. Of whom, 52% were in the vowed religious community and 48% were living in the independent retirement community.  39% of our sample were men and 61% of our sample were women. 75% of our sample was white. Activity hours or hours spent related to paid work or volunteer hours was significantly different by group with a large effect size. The vowed religious community spent significantly more time in work-related activity than compared to the independent retirement community. Additionally, we hypothesized that the vowed religious community would have higher scores on the spirituality and well-being scale. Interestingly, no significant differences were observed by group. There was also no significant associations found with the social support scale.

Depression: 5.5% of older Americans have been diagnosed with depression. The DSM-V provides standard criteria for the classification of mental disorders.  In addition, past literature repeatedly finds women report more depression than men.  Symptoms include low mood, physical symptoms and evidence of chronic diseases. The consequences can be costly and serious. A quote that characterizes this condition well states, “…everyone feels blue sometimes, but depression is sadness that persists and interferes with daily life.”

We used the Geriatric Depression Scale 15 questionnaire (GDS-15) as it’s been identified as appropriate to use with older adults to successfully diagnose depression, but has high reliability and validity.  The fifteen questions are scored based on a point system, with a higher GDS score indicative of depression. 7.6% of our participants reported depression, which was higher than the overall reported depression for older adults in America at 5.5%.

Based on review of literature, we wanted to investigate whether reported depressive symptoms differed between the two major living sites.  Our hypothesis was that older adults living in a vowed religious environment would report less depression. We conducted a Mann-Whitney U test and found there was a significant difference between the living groups, with the vowed religious group reported a higher mean depression score than the community group, indicating they were more depressed. The null hypothesis was rejected. Since research shows that depression differs by gender, we conducted another test by gender, but there was NO difference in depression scores when we compared males and females in the whole sample (p=.297).

We went on to investigate relationships between depressive symptoms and health and lifestyle factors since there is a lot of research showing depression is multifactorial. We conducted Pearson’s correlations with higher GDS scores and the significant correlations are shown here. Depression scores were associated with associated with higher perceived stress, and negatively associated with social support, indicating that as stress increased, depression increased, and as social support decreased, depression increased. Depression scores were also associated with living in the vowed religious community. The alternative hypothesis was accepted. Again, depression is usually associated with gender, but in this population it was not.

Since these factors were significantly related to the GDS scores, we conducted a multiple linear regression to investigate how much of the variance in depression scores we observed between living groups. We entered perceived stress, social support, and living environment into the regression model, and found that 21% of the variance in depression scores between the two living groups was explained. Perceived stress makes the strongest unique contribution, and is the only statistically significant contribution to depression scores when gender and social support are controlled for. Perceived stress uniquely explained 8% of the total variance in depression scores in our population. The alternative hypothesis was accepted.

So coming back to our result of the vowed religious group reporting significantly more depression based on what we measured, we ran correlations with depression scores in the vowed religious group alone, and found that as stress and trans fat intake increased, depressive symptoms increased. Furthermore, those that consume a large amount of trans fats have been found to have a 48% risk of depression due to the low grade inflammatory status and endothelial dysfunction (Villegas et al., 2011).re

These results show  a linear relationship between these variables and we cannot draw causal conclusions.  Therefore, my null hypothesis was rejected.

Our study was the first to compare levels of depression in different cohesive environments in older adults, surprisingly, our vowed religious participants reported more depression than those living in a retirement community. We obviously did not measure all factors related to development of depression, but did find stress was a contributor. For example, in study led by Fagundes et al. they evaluated relationships between depressive symptoms and stress-induced inflammation. Of the 138 participants, the more depressive symptoms produced more interleukin-6 in response to the stressor.

Another study led by Aziz et al., 2013 looked at how perceived stress, social support and home based physical activity affect older adults’ fatigue, loneliness and depression on 163 participants. The findings indicated higher social support predicted lower levels of loneliness, fatigue and depression.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the vowed religious community had a lower level of wellness than the independent retirement community. They consumed more sweets, drank less alcohol, reported more depression & had higher body fat & heart rates. Spirituality was similar in both environments, and that factor was the biggest predictor of lower stress. Dietary practices may also be related to lower stress, such as eating less sweets, getting more vitamin D and drinking responsibly.

While there is still work to be done on the manuscript, it was a great relief to get this portion of the thesis complete! We want to thank all the participants, the Benedictine Nutrition department and Dr. Bonnie Beezhold for their extensive involvement!

Photo Credit: Highland Hospital and Fairfield County 

Danger[s] of Dentures


OlderAdults_225x207By: Nikki Nies

I recently finished up my long term care rotation at the DuPage Convalescent Center (DPCC) in Wheaton, IL. I’m not one to shy away from  helping the older adult population,but I didn’t know too much about what I’d be getting into prior to the rotation.  In the seven weeks that I was at this facility, I quickly became familiar with the facility’s philosophy and way of care.  It’s very telling that during care conferences,many of the residents families’ shared how appreciative they were of the care their loved ones were receiving at DPCC and how they could tell the employees didn’t think of their daily activities as part of just “a job.”

With that said, with the many quarterly, yearly and initial assessments I completed, it became clearer as the days passed that evaluation of one’s oral care, dental and swallowing and chewing impairment affected the resident’s ability to obtain and maintain adequate nutrition.  While dentures aka false teeth can be the solution to said issues, it’s important to keep your dentures and mouth consistently clean.  If you wear ill-fitted dentures for a prolonged time, it can lead to:

  • Gum and/or mouth irritation
  • Problems eating and/or speaking
  • Mouth infections

While with age, change comes, there are preventative ways you can make sure your dentures don’t contribute and/or exacerbate existing conditions.cleaning-denture-instructions-illustration-17037495

  • Make sure to frequent the dentist as gums and bones will change and dentures won’t fit as well and your dentures will need to be adjusted
  • If you have trouble eating, don’t eat anything sticky, chew food slowly, take small bites of soft foods (i.e. eggs and yogurt) and chew foods using both sides of your mouth at the same time, which prevents dentures from moving forward or tipping
  • Use an adhesive to keep dentures in place and make them feel more secure
  • Unless dentist prescribes otherwise, do not sleep with your dentures in, especially after extraction and/or initial use of dentures
  • When holding dentures, stand over a water filled sink or place towel underneath dentures to protect in case dropped.
  • Clean dentures daily by soaking overnight with a denture cleaner and clean in the morning before putting them in your mouth
  • Use a special denture cleaning brush or soft bristled brush
  • Do not use toothpaste, bleach or powdered household cleaners as they are too abrasive
  • Clean and massage gums, tongue and roof of mouth daily prior to putting dentures.
  • Don’t use toothpicks as they can damage dentures

What denture hacks have you used to keep dentures in place? What troubles have you encountered with your dentures?

Photo Credit: Olmsted County and Dreamstime

Sources: http://dentalcarematters.com/getting-used-to-dentures-and-problems/

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/common-denture-problems

http://dentures.net/denture-problems.html

http://denturehelp.com/Pages/PS.html

ARFID


Original Image by Judit Klein via Flickr
Original Image by Judit Klein via Flickr

By: Nikki Nies

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be interning at the Center for Discovery: Eating Disorder Treatment Center in mid November! I recognize that I have an interest in merging nutrition and psychology in my future, which could be done by working with a multidisciplinary team to help those battling eating disorders.  I am looking forward to gain first hand experience of what a treatment house is like and to see the “stages” of treatment.  I recognize I need to brush up on certain terminology and have my empathetic nature at the forefront of my personality!

With that said, today I’m  exploring Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID), which is a new diagnosis that has been added to the DSM V. In prior diagnostic manuals, ARFID was known as Selective Eating Disorder (SED). Those with ARFID may be considered picky eaters.

ARFID describes individuals that do not meet the criteria of other more well known eating disorders (i.e. anorexia nervosa, binge eating and/or bulimia nervosa), but still clinically struggles with eating and food.  Someone with ARFID has a certain issue with food that impairs their ability to consume an adequate amount of nutrition.  It is possible for one to develop one of the other said eating disorders as there are some commonalities and overlap in the disorders.   As a result of the problem with eating, an individual may display:

Original Image by Andrea Parrish - Geyer via Flickr
Original Image by Andrea Parrish – Geyer via Flickr
  • Difficulty digesting certain foods
  • Avoiding certain colors or textures of food
  • Eating only very small portions
  • Having no appetite
  • Being afraid to eat after a frightening episode of choking or vomiting

Since a person may not be consuming enough calories through their diet, they may start to lose weight. If still in the growing stages of childhood, one may not necessarily lose weight, but not be up to par with the bell curve of growth. Those with ARFID may have difficulty with work and/or school due to the need to avoid work or school lunches, not getting work done on time due to the time it takes to eat and/or avoiding seeing loved ones at social events where food’s present.

If you or loved one may have ARFID, please call: (410) 938-5252 or email EatingDisorderInfo@Sheppardpratt.org for further assistance.

Sources: http://eatingdisorder.org/eating-disorder-information/eating-disorder-information/arfid/

http://ellynsatterinstitute.org/fmf/fmf89.php

http://eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_24_3_1.html

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/eating-disorders-news/201311/is-picky-eating-the-newest-eating-disorder

http://www.mirror-mirror.org/arfid.htm